Diodorus Siculus

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Diodorus Siculus

(dīədôr`əs sĭk`yo͞oləs), d. after 21 B.C., Sicilian historian. He wrote, in Greek, a world history in 40 books, ending with Caesar's Gallic Wars. Fully preserved are Books I–V and XI–XX, which cover Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Indian, Scythian, Arabian, and North African history and parts of Greek and Roman history. The history, which is a compilation of other sources, is often repetitive and contradictory. Historians generally regard it as uncritical and unreliable. It is valuable, however, as a source for the lost works of earlier authors, from whom he borrowed freely, and for his chronological lists of prominent figures from the 5th cent. to 302 B.C.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Diodorus Siculus

 

Born circa 90 B.C. in Agyrium, Sicily; died 21 B.C. Ancient Greek historian.

Diodorus was the author of the 40-volume work The Historical Library, of which only volumes 1-5 and 11-20 and fragments of the remaining volumes have survived. This work presents a synchronous account of the history of the ancient East, Greece, the Hellenistic states, and Rome from legendary times to the middle of the first century B.C. Even though Diodorus’ works are mere compilations, and chronologically inaccurate, they have a certain value owing to their use of several sources lost in ancient times. Of particular interest is the information on the classical period of Greek history, the description of the reigns of the emperors Philip II and Alexander the Great, and the reports of the slave uprisings in Sicily in the second century B.C.

WORKS

Diodori Bibliotheca historica, vols. 1-5. Edited by J. Teubner. Leipzig, 1888-1906.
In Russian translation:
In Istoricheskaia biblioteka, vols. 1-6. St. Petersburg, 1774-75.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Diodorus XIX 48.1 we read that Antigonus had received "royal honor" (time basilike) from the indigenous people when he arrived in Persis (316 BC); Seleucus honored Antigonus with royal gifts ([phrase omitted]) when he entered Babylon in 316; the Athenians too hailed Antigonus as king before 306/5 BC, viz.
To offset the bounce factor McLintock has given Diodorus a nice break and he should prove a tough nut to crack.
(7.) Diodorus Siculus, Diodorus of Sicily in Twelve Volumes, trans.
(43) A century ago, a scholar attempted to restore the Life of Epaminondas by bringing together quotations (with analyses) using not only an array of passages from Plutarch (some not having directly to do with Epaminondas), but also passages from Cornelius Nepos, Xenophon, Diodorus Siculus, Cicero, Polyaenus, and others to fit the passages together.
As the Editor in Chief observes in her Preface (vii), it was a fortunate result of chance that the main articles deal with historians, on the one hand, the Hellenistic authors Polybius and Diodorus Siculus, and on the other, from late-antiquity, Zosimus Historicus, Procopius of Caesarea, and the fictitious Dares Phrygius, the latter once believed to be primus fere historicorum.
The Aidan O'Brientrained Diodorus looks the short-priced banker in the Download The Ladbrokes App Maiden while, back on the level, Noel Meade's Dodgybingo has definite prospects in the finale.
Epicurean sources admonish against suicide in most cases; as Panagiotopoulos noted in his symposium presentation, Diodorus is the only Epicurean in antiquity who is .known to have committed suicide.
Diodorus Siculus offers a version of the arrival of the Magna Mater in which there is no participant named Claudia.
At the same time, however, her initial choice to stop her corpus of Greek historiography at Diodorus is somehow problematic.
It brings together three majors ancient texts: the "fatalist argument" discussed by Aristotle in De interpretatione 9, the claims attributed to the Megarians in Metaphysics 9, and, my main concern, Diodorus Cronus's master argument reported by Epictetus in Discourses 2.19.
She reaffirmed that Diodorus the Sicilian had reported the merweat people were agile in the use of arrows and bows and in hitting the targets.