Diomede Islands


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Diomede Islands

(dī`əmēd), pair of rocky islands in Bering Strait between Alaska and Siberia. The larger island, Big Diomede, is Russian, while the smaller is part of Alaska. At 2 mi (3 km) apart, the Diomedes represent the closest approach of U.S. and Russian land masses. The first European explorer to the islands was the Danish Vitus BeringBering, Vitus Jonassen
, 1681–1741, Danish explorer in Russian employ. In 1725 he was selected by Peter I to explore far NE Siberia. Having finally moved men and supplies across Siberia, Bering in 1728 sailed N through Bering Strait but sighted no land and did not
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 in 1728.

Diomede Islands

 

(Gvozdev Islands), two islands and rocks in the Bering Strait. The western island, Ratmanov Island (with an area of approximately 10 sq km), belongs to the USSR; the eastern island, Little Diomede (Krusenstern) Island, and Fairway Rock belong to the USA. In 1728 one of the islands was discovered by V. Bering’s expedition. In 1732 the Diomede Islands were put on the map by I. Fedorov and M. S. Gvozdev.

References in periodicals archive ?
The tunnel would utilize Little Diomede Island and Big Diomede Island with shafts to be sunk into each island.
We estimated the date on which whales entered the Bering Sea as the day when they passed south of the Diomede Islands (65.75 [degrees] N; Fig.
The first and last dates of transmission south of the Diomede Islands in the Bering Strait (65.75[degrees]N) are termed 'Earliest' and 'Latest,' respectively.
During November and Decem-ber 2008, the whales remained largely in the Bering Strait, within 75 km of the Diomede Islands (Quakenbush et al., 2010); in those same months in 2009, they moved farther south into the Bering Sea.
The peninsula's Cape Prince of Wales is the westernmost point on the North American mainland, with the Diomede Islands anchored some 25 miles off the coast in the Bering Sea.
Both Little and Big Diomede islands serve as large seabird colonies during the summer.
Nutrient surveys were undertaken in both ice-covered and open-water seasons to assess whether samples collected from the water intake were biased by proximity to the Diomede islands. During spring sampling, we drilled holes through the ice and used a battery-operated marine bilge pump to draw water samples from surface and bottom waters.
We demonstrate the potential of a shore-based laboratory to monitor the water masses that flow predominantly northward past Little Diomede Island in the center of the Bering Strait into the Arctic Ocean.
Although it is widely accepted that the Bering Strait repeatedly served as the central part of the Bering Land Bridge connecting Asia and North America (Hopkins, 1967), the Pleistocene history of the Diomede Islands, situated at the narrowest part of the Bering Strait, has remained unstudied.
Geomorphology and projected uplift rates indicate that the upland surface of Little Diomede Island may represent a high sea level stand that occurred 2.6 million years ago in the Bering Strait.
Lawrence, King, and the Diomede Islands (Bedard, 1969b; Hunt and Harrison, 1990; Piatt et al., 1992).
Foraging distribution and feeding ecology of seabirds at the Diomede Islands, Bering Strait.