Nonnus

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Nonnus

(nŏn`əs), fl. 5th cent.?, Greek poet, b. Panopolis, Egypt. His extant epic, Dionysiaca (in 48 books), a collection of legends about Dionysus, has innovations in meter that predict the later accentual versification. He is probably also the author of a hexameter version of the Gospel of St. John.
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References in periodicals archive ?
They cover the poetry of the Dionysiaca, the poetry of the Paraphrasis, and Nonnus of Panopolis in context.
(32.) Propertius 3.2.7-8; Appian, Illurike 2; Nonnus, Dionysiaca 39.257-66 and 40.555.
A similar programmatic Proteus appears in the opening of Nonnus' Dionysiaca (1,13-33).
And the rain's comrade, the bow of Iris, wove her many colours into a rounded track and shone bent under the light-shafts of Helios the Sun opposite, mingling pale with dark, and light with rosy." ~ Nonnus, Dionysiaca 2.
John's Gospel, Dionysus and Christ in his Dionysiaca, and the poetics of late antiquity.
Dionysiaca the ubiquity of visual and verbal misrepresentation, and the
Nonnus, Dionysiaca 25.265)", not just epic (2004:235).
When Nonnus of Panopolis (fifth century C.E.), in a poetic description of cosmic upheaval, tells that the giant Typhon dragged "first Phosphorus, then Hesperus and the crest of Atlas" from the sky (Dionysiaca, 1.206.
(68) The English translation is mine from the following John Sarracenus's Latin translation of the On the Divine Names, which Aquinas seems to rely upon: "[Q]uae ille, sive a sanctis theologis accepit, sive ex perita eloquiorum perscrutatione conspexit et multa circa ipsa luctatione et contritione, sive etiam ex quadam doctus est diviniore inspiratione, non solum discens sed et patiens diana, et ex compassione ad ipsa (si ita oportet dicere) ad indocibilem et mysticam ipsorum perfectus est unitionem et fidem." This Latin text is quoted from Dionysiaca, ed.
Nonnus indeed refers to 'cubistic' plunging movements in terms of dance in his Dionysiaca.(44) Emmanuel refers both to Homer's account of cubistic acrobats leading the dance on the circular floor depicted on Hephaistos' shield and to Xenophon's Convivium.(45) Without this validation it is unlikely that Jarry would have felt able to make such a firm statement placing acrobatics on an intellectual and spiritual par with the high arts of dancing and writing.
At least Nonnus, Dionysiaca 48.408 [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII];(8) suggests that in some earlier poem Nemesis played a part in Niobe's transformation.