Nonnus

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Nonnus

(nŏn`əs), fl. 5th cent.?, Greek poet, b. Panopolis, Egypt. His extant epic, Dionysiaca (in 48 books), a collection of legends about Dionysus, has innovations in meter that predict the later accentual versification. He is probably also the author of a hexameter version of the Gospel of St. John.
References in periodicals archive ?
They cover the poetry of the Dionysiaca, the poetry of the Paraphrasis, and Nonnus of Panopolis in context.
A similar programmatic Proteus appears in the opening of Nonnus' Dionysiaca (1,13-33).
John's Gospel, Dionysus and Christ in his Dionysiaca, and the poetics of late antiquity.
sensate and ideational in the Dionysiaca, it is not surprising that one
This was probably a paraphrase from the De divinis nominibus (Dionisio Aeropagita, Dionysiaca.
Nonnus indeed refers to 'cubistic' plunging movements in terms of dance in his Dionysiaca.
His chief work is the Dionysiaca, a hexameter poem in 48 books; its main subject, submerged in a chaos of subplots, is the expedition of the god Dionysus to India.
An elaboration of Homer's version of the story can be found in Nonnus, Dionysiaca 20.
Nonnus was born in Egypt during the fifth century AD, and his Dionysiaca, to date the longest extant epic in Greek, was very popular and influential until the 19th century.
Vincent Giraudet, "Virginity at Stake: Greek Novels, Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles, and the Dionysiaca of Nonnus Panopolitanus" (49-64) studies parallel scenes involving a snake that protects the virginity of a heroine in Nonnus' Dionysiaca (35.
The volume opens with an article by one of the great masters of Nonnian studies, Pierre Chuvin, who shows that the Dionysiaca is not a poem of true Dionysiac religiosity; the epic provides solace through hope, and not salvation per se.
3, 4), the dancing Silenus in Nonnus's Dionysiaca transforms himself into a river ([LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII])