Dionysius of Halicarnassus


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Dionysius of Halicarnassus

(dīənĭsh`ēəs, hăl'ĭkärnăs`əs), fl. late 1st cent. B.C., Greek rhetorician and historian. He taught at Rome and was one of the most celebrated of ancient critics. Among his extant works are On the Arrangement of Words, On Imitation, On the Early Orators, On Thucydides, and On the Eloquence of Demosthenes. The Art of Rhetoric attributed to him is probably of later date. Of his longest work, Antiquities of Rome, in 20 books, approximately the first half is extant. In it the history of Rome to the 3d cent. B.C. is covered.

Dionysius of Halicarnassus

 

Years of birth and death unknown. Ancient Greek historian and rhetorician of the second half of the first century B.C.

Dionysius was born in Halicarnassus (Asia Minor). Beginning in 30 B.C. he lived in Rome, where he wrote in Greek his principal work, Roman Antiquities, a history of Rome from mythological times to the beginning of the First Punic War. Of its 20 books the first nine, substantial parts of Books 10 and 11, and fragments of the remaining ones have been preserved; in the books that have been preserved the exposition is brought down to 442 B.C.’ Dionysius’ political views were close to those prevailing in senatorial, aristocratic circles. His writings are marked by an uncritical attitude toward sources. Dionysius was also the author of several works on rhetoric (On the Arrangement of Words, On the Ancient Orators).

WORKS

Opuscula, vols. 1-2. Leipzig, 1899-1904.
Dionysii Halicarnassensis Antiquitatum Romanoum quae supersunt. Edited by C. Jacoby. vols. 1-5. Leipzig, 1885-1925.
In Russian translation:
In Antichnye teorii iazyka i stilia. Moscow-Leningrad, 1936.
References in periodicals archive ?
Page 47 note 4: "Usher 7, 1-2." The correct reference is: Dionysius of Halicarnassus, On Lysias 7.1-2.
The critical perception of Aristophenes is transmitted later to the critics like Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Longinus and Plutarch.
younger Greek contemporary of Cicero's, Dionysius of Halicarnassus,
Herodotus' Histories had long been known and would have been familiar to Dionysius of Halicarnassus.(2) Dionysius' historical work had much in common with that of his fellow Halicarnassian, who had been a great influence on him.(3) Herodotus was also a source for Pausanias when he came to write his own version of the foundation of Miletus, two centuries after Dionysius wrote his Antiquitates Romanae.
Foster, 14 vols, Loeb Classical Library (London: Heinemann; Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1919-59), I: Roman Antiquities of Dionysius of Halicarnassus, with an English translation by Ernest Cary, 7 vols, Loeb Classical Library (London: Heinemann; Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1937-56), II.
Or with Josephus or Dionysius of Halicarnassus? Why should Matthew's style/diction/usage determine what is characteristic--or uncharacteristic--of Luke?
The Oresres fragment confirms a scholiast's comment about the instrumental accompaniment sometimes farsing out the metre; it corroborates Dionysius of Halicarnassus' statement about the non-correspondence of tone and tune in another part of the same play; and it demonstrates a particular characteristic that Aristophanes lampoons.
The study of history furnishes what Dionysius of Halicarnassus praised as "philosophy learned by example," instills a sense of humor, wards off what Hamlet decried as "the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune," allows the citizens of a democracy to know the difference between their enemies and their friends.
In his critical treatise On Thucydides the Hellenistic scholar Dionysius of Halicarnassus discussed the historians preceding Thucydides so that he could better illustrate the originality and genius of his subject.(1) Since only fragments of those writers' works survive, Dionysius' brief discussion is important testimony for understanding the nature of their literary activity.
The death of Aeneas is described by Dionysius of Halicarnassus. After he had fallen in battle against the Rutuli, his body could not be found, and he was thereafter worshiped as a local god, Juppiter indiges , as Livy reports.
The "Ode to Aphrodite" was preserved by the critic Dionysius of Halicarnassus (late first century B.C.), who quoted it as an example of smoothly flowing verse composition with a sonantal euphony resulting from avoidance of excessive use of consonants.
The ideology of classicism; language, history, and identity in Dionysius of Halicarnassus.