Dionysius of Halicarnassus


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Dionysius of Halicarnassus

(dīənĭsh`ēəs, hăl'ĭkärnăs`əs), fl. late 1st cent. B.C., Greek rhetorician and historian. He taught at Rome and was one of the most celebrated of ancient critics. Among his extant works are On the Arrangement of Words, On Imitation, On the Early Orators, On Thucydides, and On the Eloquence of Demosthenes. The Art of Rhetoric attributed to him is probably of later date. Of his longest work, Antiquities of Rome, in 20 books, approximately the first half is extant. In it the history of Rome to the 3d cent. B.C. is covered.

Dionysius of Halicarnassus

 

Years of birth and death unknown. Ancient Greek historian and rhetorician of the second half of the first century B.C.

Dionysius was born in Halicarnassus (Asia Minor). Beginning in 30 B.C. he lived in Rome, where he wrote in Greek his principal work, Roman Antiquities, a history of Rome from mythological times to the beginning of the First Punic War. Of its 20 books the first nine, substantial parts of Books 10 and 11, and fragments of the remaining ones have been preserved; in the books that have been preserved the exposition is brought down to 442 B.C.’ Dionysius’ political views were close to those prevailing in senatorial, aristocratic circles. His writings are marked by an uncritical attitude toward sources. Dionysius was also the author of several works on rhetoric (On the Arrangement of Words, On the Ancient Orators).

WORKS

Opuscula, vols. 1-2. Leipzig, 1899-1904.
Dionysii Halicarnassensis Antiquitatum Romanoum quae supersunt. Edited by C. Jacoby. vols. 1-5. Leipzig, 1885-1925.
In Russian translation:
In Antichnye teorii iazyka i stilia. Moscow-Leningrad, 1936.
References in periodicals archive ?
4) Dionysius, The Roman Antiquities of Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Trans.
We must not read the ancients," Dionysius of Halicarnassus writes, " superficially, expecting that benefit will come to us imperceptibly, but with principles to guide us, particularly if we wish to adorn our own logos with excellent features drawn from all of the ancients.
8) Dionysius of Halicarnassus, a Greek historian writing two
Herodotus' Histories had long been known and would have been familiar to Dionysius of Halicarnassus.
As Lawrence Riddle, Georges Couton, and, more recently, David Clarke have pointed out, (3) information provided in Book iii of the Roman Antiquities of Dionysius of Halicarnassus appears to have been used to complement the account given by Livy in Book I of Ab urbe condita.
The study of history furnishes what Dionysius of Halicarnassus praised as "philosophy learned by example," instills a sense of humor, wards off what Hamlet decried as "the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune," allows the citizens of a democracy to know the difference between their enemies and their friends.
In his critical treatise On Thucydides the Hellenistic scholar Dionysius of Halicarnassus discussed the historians preceding Thucydides so that he could better illustrate the originality and genius of his subject.
The death of Aeneas is described by Dionysius of Halicarnassus.
The "Ode to Aphrodite" was preserved by the critic Dionysius of Halicarnassus (late first century B.
The ideology of classicism; language, history, and identity in Dionysius of Halicarnassus.
ABSTRACT: The figure of Dionysius of Halicarnassus is a privileged case for the study of Roman ecumenism, if we consider that it is a concept received from Greek civilization and strengthened thanks to Roman imperialism, which to a large extent served as the basic theme of his historiographical work.
In the mid fifteenth century, the wealthy medical bibliophile Giovanni di Marco da Rimini, owned -- alongside his impeccably scholastic medical and philosophical books -- a respectable collection of ancient history, including works or parts of works of Livy, Josephus, Diogenes Laertius, and Dionysius of Halicarnassus.