Diophantine equation


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Diophantine equation

(mathematics)
Equations with integer coefficients to which integer solutions are sought. Because the results are restricted to integers, different algorithms must be used from those which find real solutions.

References in periodicals archive ?
The inner feedback loop will be designed based on linear algebraic method, by solving a set of Diophantine equations, while the outer loop will be designed using linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller, which is one of the robust controllers.
We can show that this condition is equivalent to a = 2A/B with a rational solution (A, B) of the Diophantine equation [A.sup.2] - 2[B.sup.2] = 1.
The Diophantine equation (11) determines only the polynomials R and S.
The Diophantine equation has two solutions called solution 1 and solution 2.
The final theorem was not formulated all the time (not even with teachers), because other important aspects needed to be clarified (such as the sieve method for counting, or the properties of the linear diophantine equation, including the existence of positive solutions), but all the activities had very substantial mathematical content, and this content was developed along the questions posed (or difficulties faced) by the participants.
Denoting by ([x.sub.v], [y.sub.v]) the v-th solution of the Diophantine equation (2), ([x.sub.v], [y.sub.v]) satisfies the following recurrence relation:
(ii) It is known that the Diophantine equation [x.sup.2] + [y.sup.2] = n has a nonnegative primitive solution if and only if every odd prime factor of n is congruent to 1 modulo 4 (see e.g.
(The same argument holds for Case 2.) Putting everything together, we get that the number of primes p [member of] (X/2, X) such that the Diophantine equation (1) can have a non-trivial proper solution is
Hence we can write the equation 4n+8=2p as 4n - 2p= - 8 which is nothing but a diophantine equation. There fore this equation has integer solution as g.c.d (4,-2) divides -8.
We search for nonzero integral triples (x, y, z) satisfying the quartic Diophantine equation 2[x.sup.2][z.sup.2] = [y.sup.2]([x.sup.2] + [z.sup.2]).
It asks whether there is a mechanical procedure, such as could be programmed into a computer, for deciding whether a Diophantine equation has solutions (a Diophantine equation is one like the Fermat equation [x.sup.n] + [y.sup.n] = [Z.sup.n], where solutions must be whole numbers).