Diophantus


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Diophantus

(dīəfăn`təs), fl. A.D. 250, Greek algebraist. He pioneered in solving a type of indeterminate algebraic equation where one seeks integer values for the unknowns; work in this field is known as Diophantine analysis. Only 6 of the 13 books with which he is credited are extant. The standard edition in Greek was edited by Paul Tannery (2 vol., 1893–95).

Bibliography

See study and English translation by T. L. Heath (2d ed. 1910, repr. 1964).

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Diophantus

3rd century ad, Greek mathematician, noted for his treatise on the theory of numbers, Arithmetica
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