diorama

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diorama

1. a miniature three-dimensional scene, in which models of figures are seen against a background
2. a picture made up of illuminated translucent curtains, viewed through an aperture
3. a museum display, as of an animal, of a specimen in its natural setting
4. Films a scene produced by the rearrangement of lighting effects
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Diorama

A large painting, or series of paintings, intended for exhibition in a darkened room in a manner that produces an appearance of reality created by optical illusions; a building in which such paintings are exhibited.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Diorama

 

(1) A painting in which an image is reproduced on a specially illuminated translucent material.

(2) A more contemporary use of the word refers to a type of painting in which a filmlike picture, drawn vertically across the inner surface of a semicircular subframe, is combined with an object plane situated in front of it (for example, stage settings, material objects, and various structures). Designed for artificial lighting, large dioramas are set up in specially constructed buildings. In Dioramas, as in panoramas, natural representation (primarily battle scenes) attains great illusory effects. The first diorama was created in 1822 by L. J. Daguerre in Paris; Daguerre’s invention won popular acclaim during the 19th century.

The most significant Soviet diorama is The May 7, 1944, Assault on Mount Sapun. Other dioramas are Assault on Perekop (1961; artists, M. I. Samsonov, M. A. Anan’ev, and V. P. Fel’dman; Central Museum of the Armed Forces of the USSR, Moscow), The Assault of the Ochakov Fortress by Russian Troops in 1788 (1970, artist, M. I. Samsonov; A. V. Suvorov Military and Historical Museum in Ochakov), and The 1905 Uprising in Perm’ (1970; artists E. I. Danilevskii and M. A. Anan’ev; Perm’).

REFERENCE

Petiopavlovskii, V. Iskusstvo panoram i dioram. Kiev, 1965.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

diorama

1. A large painting, or a series of paintings, intended for exhibition to spectators in a darkened room in a manner to produce by optical illusions an appearance of reality.
2. A building in which such paintings are exhibited.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, models of various boats, often overlooked on the way to the dioramas and depicted on the important Murillo Velarde maps of the Philippines of 1734 and 1744, highlight the physical foundation of the nation and the influence of the sea in history.
Alongside the Diorama Exhibit, LNC's giant Christmas tree was also lighted on December 1.
They ordered their information, identified opportunities to connect to their diorama and practiced each of their sections.
'Yes, you see a lot of my dioramas on sale and for display but you do not know how many of them ended up in the bin.
With the help of audio guides, visitors can hear the history depicted in each diorama in six languages, including Urdu and English.
Karam's collection broke the record with 37,777 model cars and 577 dioramas, a collection that continues to grow annually.
In the first WWII diorama at the US Army Women's Museum, a new recruit receives her uniform at a clothing warehouse.
It's still a venerated museum of history and visual arts; there are still paintings, permanent collections of ceramics and gold, year-round workshops and projects, and an iconic diorama that was probably the most amazing thing you've seen since third grade.
Animals, that diorama fixture, were everywhere, sometimes by reference: a figure curled catlike atop a piano or scaling a wall like a lemur.
A study-like atmosphere is created with haunting wallpaper, portrait paintings, bookworks, and miniature dioramas that illustrate the various demented women and their distorted visions.
Chris Mrosko's BUILDING DIORAMAS (9780890248706, $21.99) comes from an acclaimed modeler who shows how to make dramatic dioramas to showcase models, and uses a step-by-step approach to diorama modeling that includes selecting the right foundation for the display, painting and using realistic elements, and creating dioramas that profile figures.
Contents: The Formation of a Panoramaniac -Introduction: Moving Panorama -a Missing Medium -The Incubation Era: Antecedents and Anticipations -Large as Life, and Moving: The Peristrephic Panorama -Rolling Across the Stage: The Moving Panorama and the Theatre -Transformed By The Light: The Diorama and the "dioramas" -The Panoramania, or The Mid-Century Moving Panorama Craze -Panoramania in Practice: Albert Smith and his Moving Panoramas -The Moving Panorama Performance: an Excavation -Intermedial Tug of War, or Panoramas and Magic Lanterns -Sensory Bombardment: a Medium's Final Fanfares -The Discursive Transfiguration of the Moving Panorama -Conclusion: From Panoramas to Media Culture.