Dipodidae


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Dipodidae

[də′päd·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
The Old World jerboas, a family of mammals in the order Rodentia.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Dipodidae

 

a family of mammals of the order Rodentia. The body measures 5.5–25 cm in length. The tail is longer than the trunk and often has a flat black and white tuft on the tip. The hind extremities are longer than the front ones and have an elongated foot and shortened lateral digits, which in some species are absent. Many Dipodidae move by jumping on the hind legs alone. They usually inhabit open areas in mountains and valleys in the temperate and torrid zones of Eurasia, North Africa, and North America.

The Dipodidae include approximately 30 species, belonging to 14 genera. The 22 species found in the USSR are from nine genera, the most common being Sicista, Salpingotus, Cardiocranus, and Pygeretmus. All Dipodidae hibernate. They are active at night or at twilight, feeding mainly on underground parts of plants and on seeds. They bear one or two litters a year. Some Dipodidae damage plants that reinforce sand, and some transmit the causative agents of a number of diseases. Fossil remains are known from the Oligocene.

REFERENCE

Mlekopitaiushchie fauny SSSR, part 1. Moscow-Leningrad, 1963.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
([paragraph]) Member of the order Rodentia, family Dipodidae. (#) Member of the order Insectivora, family Erinaceidae.
199 The evolution of bipedal locomotion in jerboas, desert rodents of the family Dipodidae, makes them marvelously adapted to running.
Asian deserts are dominated by two families of rodents: the Muridae, including gerbils and jirds (Gerbilinae, e.g., Dipodillus, Desmodillus, Gerbillus, Meriones, Rhombomys, Tatera), and the Dipodidae, including 11 genera of jerboas and their relatives (e.g., Allactaga, Cardiocranius, Dipus, Jaculus, Pygeretmus, Salpingotus).
In the Saharo-Sindian deserts, just two families of rodents, the gerbils and (Gerbillidae) and the jerboas (Dipodidae), have adapted so effectively that between them they can exploit all the desert environments.
2008: New species of five-toed jerboa (Rodentia: Dipodidae, Allactaginae) from North-East Iran.
Family Dipodidae (Zapodinae) (jumping mice) Zapus hudsonius (Zimmermann), I meadow jumping mouse Order Carnivora (canids) Family Canidae (canids) Canis latrans Say, coyote I Urocyon cinereoargenteus I (Schreber), gray fox Vulpes vulpes (Linnaeus), red fox I Family Procyonidae (raccoons and allies) Procyon lotor (Linnaeus), raccoon I Family Mustelidae (weasels, badger, otter) Lutra canadensis (Schrebder), river otter I The river otter became extirpated in 1942, but was reintroduced between 1995 and 1999.
The total number of rodent species includes seven species in the squirrel family; the beaver; two sigmodontine rodents (= old Cricetinae), both of which are in the genus Peromyscus; four or five species of arvicoline rodents (= old Microtinae; muskrat, three voles and probably the bog lemming); two Old World rodents (Murinae), the Norway rat and the house mouse; and the meadow jumping mouse (Zapodinae, Dipodidae).