dipstick

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dipstick

a graduated rod or strip dipped into a container to indicate the fluid level
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dipstick

[′dip‚stik]
(engineering)
A graduated rod which measures depth when dipped in a liquid, used, for example, to measure the oil in an automobile engine crankcase.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dipstick

A graduated scale in the form of a stick to measure oil or fluid level.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
We ordered this dipstick and when it arrived, it wasn't the same as the one it replaced.
Based in rural Northumberland, Dipsticks is on target to turn over pounds 3m and employs 38 full-time staff and more than 700 part-time and project-based workers across the UK.
The aim of this study was to determine the microscopic review rate from randomly selected urine samples in a general tertiary care hospital after a simultaneous dipstick measurement with a dipstick reader and automated counting of particles by the UF-100 flow cytometer.
The old dipstick has a scribe mark about an inch above the two holes located at the end of the stick.
The principle of the immunochromatographic urinary trypsinogen-2 dipstick tests has been described (21).
Next, pull the dipstick out and check for oil on both sides.
Dipstick: It's important to remember that people don't change for other people; they change for themselves.
Aspire assistant director, Michael Mitchell, said: "Dipsticks is an example of the good practice that we are keen for other businesses in the region to take-up.
Dipsticks require careful storage because those dipsticks exposed to air have a rapid and cumulative loss of specificity over time for nitrite (6) and give false-positive results for glucose after 7 days and false-negative results for blood after 28 days (7).
All staff at Dipsticks Research undertake learning, irrespective of the level they are working at.
Free introduced the idea that important analytes in urine could be tested on a strip of paper impregnated with chemicals that would produce color changes with differing amounts of analyte in the urine-an idea that became the now ubiquitous urine dipstick. In 1946, he developed dry reagent chemistries for semi-quantitative detection of blood in urine, and in subsequent years followed this with chemistries for ketones, albumin, and bilirubin.
* A series of semiquantitative chemical screening tests that are performed using dipsticks