Direct/indirect lighting

Direct/indirect lighting

Lighting that is mixed from direct sources and indirect reflection. In daylighting, this means that some part of the light of the sky or the sun is bounced off some surface, while at least part of the sky is still visible from the point in question. In electrical lighting, it means that luminaires of different types are installed, or there are luminaires that emit light both up to the ceiling and down to the workspace. The advantages include a good balance between ambient illumination of the room and accent lighting and relatively good energy efficiency even in large spaces. The smaller direct component required makes it easier to control reflective glare on computer screens, and it renders three-dimensional objects well without harsh shadows. Disadvantages include relatively high installation and maintenance costs. Users often need instruction on how to use the system effectively.
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