direct conversion receiver


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direct conversion receiver

Also called a "tuned radio frequency" (TRF) receiver, it is a radio receiver that detects and demodulates the carrier signal broadcast by the station without using an intermediate frequency (IF) stage. A variable filter is tuned to filter out everything but the desired radio station's carrier frequency. Along with the homodyne receiver, direct conversion was one of the earlier methods of building radios, both of which were superseded by the superheterodyne approach. See superheterodyne receiver.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tatu, "Comparative demodulation results for six-port and conventional 60 GHz direct conversion receivers," Progress In Electromagnetics Research, Vol.
The direct conversion receiver system performance, EVM, BER and PER based on an 802.
05) sets the IP2 requirement for a direct conversion receiver.
Very much like its well established super-heterodyne receiver counterpart, first introduced in 1918 by Armstrong, [1] the origins of the direct conversion receiver (DCR) date back to the first half of last century when a single down-conversion receiver was first described by F.