scattering theory

(redirected from Direct scattering problem)

scattering theory

[′skad·ə·riŋ ‚thē·ə·rē]
(physics)
The discipline that mathematically determines the amplitudes of the scattered fields in a scattering process or collision from the equations of motion of the interacting particles, including the potential energy of the interaction. Also known as direct scattering theory.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Section 2, we survey two-dimensional direct scattering problem and topological derivative based imaging technique.
Introduction to Direct Scattering Problem and Topological Derivative
Section 2 introduces the two-dimensional direct scattering problem and an asymptotic expansion formula in the presence of small inhomogeneities.
In Section 2, we briefly survey the two-dimensional direct scattering problem, far-field pattern, and MUSIC algorithm.
The data for both the training and testing sets are obtained from solving the direct scattering problem. The training set is made up by 441 examples.
In Section 2, we briefly review the two-dimensional direct scattering problem, and an asymptotic expansion formula for far-field patterns, and introduce the imaging function introduced in [19].
In Section 2, the two-dimensional direct scattering problem and topological derivative based imaging function are introduced.

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