direct tax

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Related to Direct taxation: Indirect taxation

direct tax

a tax paid by the person or organization on which it is levied
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Importantly, direct taxation allows richer segments of the society to be taxed more and poorer classes are provided with relief and benefits in line with the philosophy of Iqbal.
Moreover, the government is moving towards direct taxation regime while gradually curtailing the indirect taxation, he added.
'Moreover, the government is moving towards direct taxation while gradually curtailing indirect taxes,' he said while speaking at a seminar titled 'Economic Reforms: Way Forward', organised by the Sustainable Development Policy Institute (SDPI) on Friday.
Of the e1/42.28bn owed, e1/41.23bn relates to direct taxation -- not including interest and fees -- concerning 135,600 persons.
The EU imposes VAT rates for all member "states" and has for years been planning a direct taxation system on all its member states, meaning our taxes will go direct to Brussels then some of it given back as they see fit.
The EU imposes VAT rates for all member "States" and there have been calls for a direct taxation system on all its member states, meaning our taxes would go direct to Brussels then some of it given back as they see fit.
Today, direct taxation is a course of action to build federal funds that has been in place for as long as most Canadians can remember.
It would be the first time the region has introduced direct taxation , in an attempt to boost regional coffers following a sharp drop in the oil price.
* VAT operation, legislation and mechanics focus of 3-day programme * EY Cyprus has prepared a VAT training seminar, funded by the EU Commission, to be delivered to Tax Department officers (Direct Taxation Division) and, to other officials, including Tax Tribunal members.
I agree that more taxation from wealthier persons is required to balance the situation, but this should be from direct taxation, with the indirect ones (which penalise poorer people more) reduced or eliminated.
Editors Haslehner, Kofler, and Rust present readers with a collection of expert summaries and analyses of landmark ECJ decisions regarding direct taxation taken from materials presented at a conference held at the University of Luxembourg in 2014.