direct conversion receiver

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direct conversion receiver

Also called a "tuned radio frequency" (TRF) receiver, it is a radio receiver that detects and demodulates the carrier signal broadcast by the station without using an intermediate frequency (IF) stage. A variable filter is tuned to filter out everything but the desired radio station's carrier frequency. Along with the homodyne receiver, direct conversion was one of the earlier methods of building radios, both of which were superseded by the superheterodyne approach. See superheterodyne receiver.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 1 shows the general models of the FPD and TPD that are used in direct-conversion receiver architectures.
Since then, the field of applications of six-port systems has been extended to measurement of direction of arrival (DoA) of multiple signals [2, 3], phase/frequency discriminator for automobile radars [4, 5], microwave and millimeter-wave sensing [6], and demodulators in direct-conversion receivers [7-20].
To avoid the severe flicker noise, dc offset and [IIP.sub.2] problems of a direct-conversion receiver [8,9], a low-IF receiver is also widely chosen and implemented [10-13].
A series of tests is designed to identify the limiting stage in a fully integrated direct-conversion receiver (DCR).
In this article, the third-order nonlinearity of a direct-conversion receiver (DCR) is evaluated with a set of well-designed tests.
An example of an UTRA/FDD direct-conversion receiver is shown in Figure 6.
With the tremendous advances in RFIC technology, over the last few years, direct-conversion receiver ICs are fast becoming popular with pager designers.
Laskar, "Design and analysis of low flicker-noise CMOS mixers for direct-conversion receivers" IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques, vol.
Raman, "DC offsets in direct-conversion receivers: Characterization and implications," IEEE Microwave Magazine, Vol.
Obviously, direct-conversion receivers require no expensive and bulky external filter for analog channel selectivity.
Tanimoto, "A 2 GHz Balanced Harmonic Mixer for Direct-conversion Receivers," 1997 IEEE Custom IC Conference, pp.
Good mixer balancing is also important in a receiving mixer to suppress LO noise, especially at very low intermediate frequencies or in direct-conversion receivers. Finally, good mixer balancing is also required in a vector modulator in a transmitter to suppress the residual carrier.

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