Distillery Residue

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Distillery Residue

 

the wastes of alcohol production from the processing of grain, potatoes, and molasses. The residue contains 92 percent to 94 percent water and 6 percent to 8 percent dry matter. It is used as animal fodder in fresh, dehydrated, and ensilaged form. The nutritive value of fresh distillery residue varies from 3.2 feed units (residue from potatoes) to 12.2 feed units (from corn) and from 0.6 to 1.7 kg of digestible protein per 100 kg of fodder. For dry distillery residue the corresponding figures are 60.2–102 feed units and 12.6–14.9 kg of digestible protein. Fresh distillery residue is usually combined with threshing-floor fodder; 70–80 liters are fed to adult meat cattle, 40–50 liters to young meat cattle, and not more than 30 liters to dairy cattle. Work horses are fed 12–18 liters in a 24-hour period. Chalk (30 to 50 g per head of cattle) is added to distillery residue to neutralize lactic acid and acetic acid. Distillery residue is preserved by freezing, ensilaging, and dehydration. Ensilaged residue, stored in combination with threshing-floor fodder, is used to feed meat and dairy cattle. Dehydrated distillery residue keeps well and is convenient to transport. It can be used to replace part of the concentrates in animal rations.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.