distributed database

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distributed database

[di′strib·yəd·əd ′dad·ə·‚bās]
(computer science)
A database maintained in physically separated locations and supported by a computer network so that it is possible to access all parts of the database from various points in the network.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

distributed database

A collection of several different databases that looks like a single database to the user. An example is the Internet Domain Name System (DNS).
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

distributed database

A database physically stored in two or more computer systems. Although geographically dispersed, a distributed database system manages and controls the entire database as a single collection of data. If redundant data are stored in separate databases due to performance requirements, updates to one set of data will automatically update the additional sets in a timely manner. See distributed ledger, replication and network transparency.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This paper suggests an efficient multi-agent approach for data search in context of contact centers with distributed data bases, considering an adequate case study and presenting experimental results.
An adequate example in the context of a contact center with search application in distributed data bases show the effectiveness of the Java-based mobile agents approach.
In order to illustrate the proposed solution for searching data in contact center with distributed data bases, we will explain the setting and describe a case study.
The distributed data base architecture does not eliminate the possibility of connecting to a central monitor or existing alarm systems.
In order to expand and to minimize costs, the industry is interested in: traffic concentration, conversion of voice to data (to reduce human intervention and cost), cable television and other media (as a means to bypass local access loops), increased interchange among proprietary and indusry networks, low-cost local storage which would facilitate distributed data bases and reduce telecommunication costs, and exploiting ISDN's (Integrated Services Digital Networks) when they become available.

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