Disuse


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Related to Disuse: disuse syndrome, disuse atrophy

Disuse

That complete sequence and series of activities and actions that eliminate the building in its present form. There are basically two options: (1) demolition and return of the building, site, and all of its components to the natural environment, or (2) renovation. The renovation option essentially leads back to the beginning of the building life-cycle model or to some intermediate stage within that model.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chronic pain of any kind predispose to the risk of developing a physical syndrome of "disuse" in which the muscle mass and decreases in terms of the mass and force if not optimally used.
The effects of ES on muscle atrophy appear to be influenced by the type of disuse model used, as well as the nature of the experimental ES regimen, which can vary in the intensity, frequency, and number of contractions [14-16].
"Some industrial use is still prominent in Digbeth however much has fallen into disuse.
The cornetto was a popular wind instrument in Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque times, but eventually fell into disuse (it's hard to play, for one thing).
It is important that these units that have served us so long and so well should not be allowed to fall into disuse, otherwise a generation of engineers will be bred to whom they are unfamiliar.
In the neighborhood of Can Sellares, the results were particularly dismal, with the public spaces falling quickly into disuse and disarray.
How again, can we explain to ourselves the inherited effects of the use of disuse of particular organs?
By the 1930s the canal had fallen into disuse but has been gradually restored by the British Waterways Board with support from the National Park and others since 1968.
A period of disuse almost resulted in the building's demolition, but was prevented when local businessman Eric Rooke refurbished it for use as a public house.
The building served the Bronx Terminal Market for over 35 years before falling into disuse and disrepair.
There was nothing in the biomedical archives that provided a reasonable framework for this apparent homology of disuse and aging.