divisor

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divisor

1. a number or quantity to be divided into another number or quantity (the dividend)
2. a number that is a factor of another number

divisor

[də′vīz·ər]
(mathematics)
The quantity by which another quantity is divided in the operation of division.
An element b in a commutative ring with identity is a divisor of an element a if there is an element c in the ring such that a = bc.

divisor

A quantity that evenly divides another quantity.

Unless otherwise stated, use of this term implies that the quantities involved are integers. (For non-integers, the more general term factor may be more appropriate.)

Example: 3 is a divisor of 15. Example: 3 is not a divisor of 14.
References in periodicals archive ?
and for the purpose of this proof, we set S(N) to be the sum of all the divisors of N, including N itself.
cl(D): the numerical equivalence class of a Cartier divisor D.
None of the industry observers would be surprised to see the divisor reduced in the near future to 120.
Then [[tau].sub.k](n) := (f * [sub.k]g)(n) is the number of k-ary divisors of n.
* How does the remainder relate to the divisor (amount of sugar per bag)?
Article 12 of the bill Abadi sponsored in December sides with the large blocs and keeps the Sainte-Lague divisor of 1.7.
Thus we find more rectangle dimension pairs using neighboring divisors as follows.
So, if care is taken with the fractions and you remember to multiply the remainder (if there is one) by the factor removed from both the dividend and divisor, Ruffini's rule can be used with linear divisors in which the coefficient of x is not 1.
Now consider non-differential zero divisors. These type of quantities are distinct elements of the algebra and thus in physical applications could be corresponded to the unit signals (elementary particles).
The proposed mathematical relation to apply tests of divisibility were independent of divisors; either low valued or high valued whereas, rules presented by (Eisenberg, 2000) were for low value divisors.
Much interest was expressed in the socalled perfect numbers such as 6, 28, 496, and 8128; numbers whose divisors add up to the number.