Dixieland


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Dixieland

1. a form of jazz that originated in New Orleans, becoming popular esp with White musicians in the second decade of the 20th century
2. a revival of this style in the 1950s

Dixieland

 

the name of early American white jazz groups. In their music, the Dixieland players imitated the traditional Negro jazz bands of New Orleans (the first Dixieland groups arose in that city in 1915). Dixieland bands were most popular in the mid-1920’s and from the late 1930’s to the early 1940’s. Dixieland bands exist in many countries, including the USSR.

References in periodicals archive ?
She was the only young person at Dixieland. Eugene spoke to her with timid hauteur.
This collection of Dixieland standards features his signature knack for translating the typical characteristics of a variety of jazz styles into arrangements that are both catchy and audience-friendly, while offering a challenge to each player in an advanced group.
Winner: Southern Music & Dixieland Jetsave touring holiday to USA for two people aged 18/over (sharing a twin/double).
Jetsave is offering Sunday Mirror readers the chance to save pounds 195 on a Southern Music & Dixieland touring holiday this June.
Dixieland jazz combines brass band marches and instruments such as the trumpet (or cornet), trombone and clarinet, and these instruments are prominent in the Carnival.- TradeArabia News Service
Carnival with Dixieland at Reef MallReef Mall, a member of Dubai Shopping Malls Group (DSMG), hosted the first CyCarnival with DixielandCO show as part of DSS 2008 activities.
Dylan's new tracks, from the tenderness of Spirit on the Water to the Dixieland quickness of Rollin' and Tumblin', were played close to album form, with instrumental breaks that highlighted the skills of Dylan's band.
Cost for the three-hour boat cruise, dinner buffet, Dixieland band, and transportation to and from the boat is $80 per person.
Perhaps this is because we could put our differences to one side in the interest of what we insisted was music back when Hal was the drummer and I the piano player in the Law School's Dixieland band.
Here, he goes one step further, adding R&B, trad jazz and rock guitar into the Dixieland mix with guests such as Van Morrison (Midnight Cannonball and Backwater Blues), Jacqui Dankworth (Let's Call the Whole Thing Off) and the Swingle Singers!
The second section presents case studies of In Dahomey, black banjo bands, visits made by American groups such as the Original Dixieland Jazz Band and the Southern Syncopated Orchestra, hot jazz, and performances at the Savoy Hotel and by Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington.
Robert Jones and Melissa Stewart provide a helpful treatment of postliberalism, along with a fascinating look at the conservative Dixieland reception of a rather radical, postliberal theologian, Stanley Hauerwas.