Dixieland

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Related to Dixieland jazz: Swing jazz

Dixieland

1. a form of jazz that originated in New Orleans, becoming popular esp with White musicians in the second decade of the 20th century
2. a revival of this style in the 1950s

Dixieland

 

the name of early American white jazz groups. In their music, the Dixieland players imitated the traditional Negro jazz bands of New Orleans (the first Dixieland groups arose in that city in 1915). Dixieland bands were most popular in the mid-1920’s and from the late 1930’s to the early 1940’s. Dixieland bands exist in many countries, including the USSR.

References in periodicals archive ?
Backed up by Jimmy LaRocca's Original Dixieland Jazz Band, New Orleans singer, songwriter, and children's musician Johnette Downing has recorded nineteen original songs that set snappy, kid-friendly lyrics to the upbeat, polycultural tunes that reflect and resound with the unique and unmistakable rhythms of jazz played superbly in the Dixieland style.
to Long Beach, dancing to animator pal Ward Kimball's Dixieland Jazz band.
Sancton, the author of Song for My Fathers: A New Orleans Story in Black and White, will touch on themes of teamwork, rebuilding and reinvention in this colorful session that combines cultural tradition with delightful renditions of authentic New Orleans Dixieland jazz music.
The second section presents case studies of In Dahomey, black banjo bands, visits made by American groups such as the Original Dixieland Jazz Band and the Southern Syncopated Orchestra, hot jazz, and performances at the Savoy Hotel and by Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington.
It happened the evening we accidentally wandered into a Dixieland jazz club in down-town San Diego.
This is the oldest continually operating Dixieland jazz joint in the world.
Among the artists featured are the Original Dixieland Jazz Band performing "Livery Stable Blues" (the first recording of a jazz band in New York); the lesbian "empress of the blues," Bessie Smith, with her tidal-wave sound; sassy Cotton Club mama Ethel Waters; and gay iconoclastic, keyboard man Cecil Taylor as well as Sarah Vaughan, Billie, Ella, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, and far too many more to mention.
A traditional fiddle player may be holding the floor in one bar, while a Dixieland jazz band is blowing strong in the pub around the corner.
Not until more than a decade later, when the original Dixieland Jazz Band and Paul Whiteman's Orchestra brought their distinctive sounds to the record market, did the industry begin to realize the value of so-called 'name' bands, with distinctive sounds and a performing existence outside the studios.
In 1943, the international impresario Sol Hurok presented Dunham's company in Tropical Revue at the Martin Beck Theater on Broadway, adding Dixieland jazz musicians to boost its commercial appeal.
Some of America's most talented musicians now run music camps for youngsters interested in learning to play ragtime and Dixieland jazz. After attending a concert given by a group of these high-school-age musicians, I spoke to one of the players.
Russell Museum's Western Art Auction or Helena's Dixieland Jazz Festival.