Dobson spectrophotometer

Dobson spectrophotometer

[′däb·sən ‚spek·trō·fə′täm·əd·ər]
(spectroscopy)
A photoelectric spectrophotometer used in the determination of the ozone content of the atmosphere; compares the solar energy at two wavelengths in the absorption band of ozone by permitting the radiation of each to fall alternately upon a photocell.
References in periodicals archive ?
NOAA scientists monitor the thickness of the ozone layer and its vertical distribution above the South Pole station by regularly releasing weather balloons carrying ozone-measuring "sondes" up to 21 miles in altitude, and with a ground-based instrument called a Dobson spectrophotometer.
The Dobson spectrophotometer measures the total amount of ozone in a column extending from Earth's surface to the edge of space in Dobson Units, defined as the number of ozone molecules that would be required to create a layer of pure ozone 0.01 millimeters thick at a temperature of 32 degrees Fahrenheit at an atmospheric pressure equivalent to Earth's surface.
Average forecast error value over the whole Polish territory with anticipation in a year makes 1.44 e.D., which is less than the TOC error measurement, provided by the Dobson spectrophotometer.
This November marks the 50th anniversary of the start of total ozone column measurements by the NOAA Dobson spectrophotometer instrument at South Pole station.
Examples of specific topics covered include aircraft electrification, airmass, anabatic wind, boundary layer, convection, Dansgaard-Oeschger event, Dobson spectrophotometer, gradient wind, katabatic wind, meteorology, noble gases, pollution control, temperature scales, waterspout, and Venturi effect.
Researchers there took measurements with the Dobson spectrophotometer, a reliable and easy-to-operate tool still in use.
Several weeks before the eclipse I calibrated TOPS against the secondary world-standard Dobson spectrophotometer in Boulder, Colorado.