Dobsonian

(redirected from Dobsonian telescope)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Dobsonian

(dob-soh -nee-ăn) A telescope with a simple but highly stable altazimuth mounting that can be constructed and used by an amateur astronomer. It swings very smoothly between side bearings and is mounted on a simple sturdy rotating platform. The mounting, pioneered in the mid-20th century by John Dobson, a US telescope maker, is popular for large-aperture short-focus reflectors.
References in periodicals archive ?
But other than using excellent optics, what can a person do to improve the view through a standard Dobsonian telescope? Turns out, there's quite a bit.
From an early age, Hauck has been an avid amateur astronomer, and fondly recalls exploring the night sky as a child with his mom's 10" Dobsonian telescope. An advocate for science education, he routinely attends public outreach events and star parties to share the hobby of stargazing with the next generation of young astronomers.
"Even after nearly 40 years there's always more to learn," says Gerard, who uses an 8in Dobsonian telescope that he put together himself to hunt for galaxies and constellations in his West Derby back garden.
Going out on a clear night with a Dobsonian telescope, a couple of eyepieces and a printed chart--this is all you need to explore the universe around us.
But what defines a Dobsonian telescope? Dobson, by the way, objects to this moniker.
The two men had settled on an Orion 8-inch Dobsonian telescope, just the right size for Josh to set up by himself.
Visitors may view the sun, Jupiter, Saturn and the moon through large telescopes; see the latest close-up NASA images of Saturn and Mars; learn how to select and use telescopes; handle ancient rocks from outer space; listen to and question guest speakers with expertise in astronomy; and win a Dobsonian telescope and other door prizes.
But at the Scarborough star fest last year, we were shown Pluto through a 14-inch Dobsonian telescope.
The Dobsonian telescope is named after the American astronomy populariser John Dobson, who created the design in the 1960s.
Speakers at the meeting included the Director, who gave his review of the Section year and showed a selection of images received, Bob Winter on the death of stars, Robin Leadbeater on the spectra of dying stars, Owen Brazell on new planetary nebulae, Chris Longthorn on observing from New Mexico Skies, Andrew Robertson on building and using a large Dobsonian telescope and David Boyd on the behaviour of Gyulbudaghian's Nebula and PV Cephei.
If you want to go fainter and deeper, the obvious next step up is a larger Dobsonian telescope. Several manufacturers offer instruments in apertures up to 16 inches, while others produce even larger scopes utilizing truss-tube designs that break down for easy transport and storage.