Dogs


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Dogs

Isle of. a district in the East End of London, bounded on three sides by the River Thames

dogs

[dȯgz]
(mining engineering)

Dogs

Argos
Odysseus’ pet, recognizes him after an absence of twenty years. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey 17:298]3
Asta
the thin man’s dog. [Am. Lit.: The Thin Man]
Balthasar
almost a Pomeranian, companion of Jolyon Forsyte at Robin Hill. [Br. Lit.: “Indian Summer of a Forsyte” ]
barghest
monstrous goblin-dog, a nocturnal specter portending death. [Br. Folklore: EB (1963) III, 110]
Boatswain
Byron’s favorite dog. [Br. Hist.: Harvey, 239]
Buck
after murder of his master, leads wolf pack. [Am. Lit.: The Call of the Wild]
Bullet Roy Rogers’
dog. [TV: “The Roy Rogers Show” in Terrace, II, 260]
Bull’s-eye
Bill Sykes’s dog. [Br. Lit.: Oliver Twist]
Cerberus
three-headed beast guarding gates of hell. [Classical Myth.: Zimmerman, 55–56]
Charley
elderly poodle that accompanied Steinbeck on trip across U.S. [Am. Lit.: John Steinbeck Travels with Charley in Weiss, 471]
Checkers
Richard Nixon’s cocker spaniel; used in his defense of slush fund (1952). [Am. Hist.: Wallechinsky, 126]
Diogenes
Dr. Blimber’s clumsy dog. [Br. Lit.: Dombey and Son]
Dominic
hound who travels widely. [Children’s Lit.: Dominic]
Fala
Franklin Roosevelt’s dog. [Am. Hist.: Wallechinsky, 126]
Flopit
small, majestically self-important, and smelling of violets. [Am. Lit.: Booth Tarkington Seventeen in Magill I, 882]
Flush
Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s spaniel, subject of a biography. [Br. Lit.: Woolf Flush in Barnhart, 446]
Gelert
greyhound slain by its master for killing his baby; he discovers that Gelert had killed a wolf menacing the child, who is found safe. [Eng. Ballad: Beddgelert in Brewer Dictionary, 93]
Hound of the Baskervilles
gigantic “fiend dog” of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s tale. [Br. Lit.: The Hound of the Baskervilles]
Jip
Dora’s little pet, lives in a tiny pagoda. [Br. Lit.: Dickens David Copperf eld]
Lassie
canine star of popular film and TV series. [TV: Terrace, II, 13–15; Radio: Buxton, 135]
Marmaduke
floppy, self-centered, playful Great Dane. [Comics: Marmaduke]
Mauthe Doog
ghostly black spaniel that haunted Peel Castle. [Br. Folklore: Benét, 649]
Montmorency
companion on Thames boat trip. [Br. Lit.: Jerome Three Men in a Boat in Magill II, 1018]
Nana
Newfoundland, nurse to the children. [Br. Lit.: J. M. Barrie Peter Pan]
Peritas
Alexander the Great’s dog. [Gk. Hist.: Harvey, 239]
Rin-Tin-Tin
early film hero; German shepherd. [Radio: Buxton, 200]
Sandy
Little Orphan Annie’s dog. [Comics: “Little Orphan Annie” in Horn, 459]
Snoopy
world’s most famous beagle. [Comics: “Peanuts” in Horn, 542]
Spot
dog accompanying Sally, Dick, and Jane in primers. [Am. Cult.: Misc.]
Toto
pet terrier who accompanies Dorothy to Oz. [Am. Lit.: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz]
References in classic literature ?
I had Vixen, who was all my dog to me; and I felt what my friend must have felt, at tearing out his heart in this style and leaving it in my garden.
The big dog's tail thumped the floor in a humble and peace-making way.
Next, in lieu of his enemy, he saw Skipper's head, and crept to it and loved it, kissing with his tongue the hard cheeks, the closed lids of the eyes that his love could not open, the immobile lips that would not utter one of the love-words they had been used to utter to the little dog.
If he rubbed once, the dog that sat on the chest of copper appeared; if he rubbed twice, there came the dog that watched over the silver chest; and if he rubbed three times, the one that guarded the gold appeared.
The dog was already outside the door, and before the Soldier could look round, in he came with the Princess.
"I won't say they was all dogs, but there was seven of 'm that got fish."
Henry stopped eating to glance across the fire and count the dogs.
The underfed dogs snapped and growled in the passages, glaring at the cold stars, and snuffing into the bitter wind, night after night.
The big dog looked at him, howled again, and slunk away down the passage, while the other dogs drew aside right and left to give him ample room.
And the man took advantage of his nearness to study him some more, lighting his pipe and running over the dog's excellent lines.
In the 'tween-decks of the Narwhal, Buck and Curly joined two other dogs. One of them was a big, snow-white fellow from Spitzbergen who had been brought away by a whaling captain, and who had later accompanied a Geological Survey into the Barrens.
The squabbling and bickering among the dogs had long since died down, and the weary animals were curled in the snow, each with his feet and nose bunched together and covered by his wolf's brush of a tail.