dogwood

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dogwood

or

cornel

(kôr`nəl), shrub or tree of the genus Cornus, chiefly of north temperate and tropical mountain regions, characteristically having an inconspicuous flower surrounded by large, showy bracts which are often mistaken for petals. This trait is evident in the flowering dogwood (C. florida) of E North America, with white or pink bracts, and the very similar Pacific dogwood (C. nuttallii) of the West. Dogwood anthracnose, a fungal disease, has killed many wild woodland dogwoods since the 1980s. Both species are cultivated as ornamentals. Their bark, rich in tannin, has been used medicinally (as is that of the other species of Cornus), for example, as a quininequinine
, white crystalline alkaloid with a bitter taste. Before the development of more effective synthetic drugs such as quinacrine, chloroquine, and primaquine, quinine was the specific agent in the treatment of malaria.
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 substitute. Their hard wood is used for various objects, e.g., machinery bearings and tool handles. The fruits of some species are edible, e.g., those of the Old World cornelian cherry (C. mas), used also for preserves and the French liqueur vin de cornouille. The bunchberry, or dwarf cornel (C. canadensis), is a low herbaceous wildflower of North America. Dogwoods are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Cornales, family Cornaceae.
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dogwood

dogwood

Most dogwood fruits are super bitter and not edible, but one palatable species is called Cornelian Cherry (available from EdibleLandscaping.com). The root-bark tea from normal Dogwoods used historically as an astringent (stops bleeding), pain-reducing anti-inflammatory, laxative, cough suppressant for malaria, fever, uterine problems and diarrhea. Twigs are chewed to clean and whiten teeth.

Dogwood

 

shrubs and trees of several species. Swida sanguinea is usually called dogwood; it is widespread in western and central regions of the European USSR and in middle and southern Europe; more rarely, S. australis, which grows in the Crimea, the Caucasus, and Asia Minor, is called dogwood. They are shrubs or low trees of the family Cornaceae, having purple shoots, white flowers and corymbiform inflorescences without spathes, and opposite, simple leaves, pale-green underneath. The fruits are juicy and spherical, blue-black or black. Both species are widely grown as ornamentals. Sometimes the wild service tree is called dogwood.


Dogwood

 

(Cornus), a genus of trees and shrubs of the family Cornaceae. The leaves are simple, entire, and opposite. The small bisexual flowers are gathered in umbellate clusters. The fruits are fleshy red drupes on stalks. Four species are found in central and southern Europe, Asia Minor, central China, Japan, and North America (California). The Soviet Union has one species, the cornelian cherry (Cornus mas). It grows in the underbrush and thickets at the edges of leafy forests in the southwestern European USSR, the Crimea, and the Caucasus. Its fruits are eaten fresh and used in preserves and compotes. The hard heavy wood is used in the manufacture of various items. Dogwood trees contain tannins, and are nectar-bearing.

dogwood

of North Carolina and Virginia. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 639]
References in periodicals archive ?
Or choose Cornus alba 'Sibirica' - Siberian dogwood - for lively red stems all year.
Critique: "Self-Portrait with Dogwood" reveals Christopher Merrill as a master of the English language and as having a genuine flair for consistently engaging his readers with observations that are as informed and informative as they are thoughtful and thought-provoking.
"We are evaluating the performance of dogwood germplasm at the arboretum as well as novel cultivars available in the American nursery industry to find those most suited to the Japanese clime," says Olsen.
Birch Ghost bramble Eucalyptus Dogwood Corkscrew hazel Willow and dogwood work well together
The Bob Timberlake Eternal Dogwood is a vigorous grower and resistant to cold, drought, and mildew.
People photographed it and wrote about it, and many an artist tried to capture its essence on canvas, but a mere camera never did the tree justice, and no artist yet has been able to capture the dogwood's soul.
In the wild, Pacific dogwood produces creamy white, saucer-size flowers that "look like doves landing on thin, dark branches," notes professor Marcia Braga, head of environmental horticulture at Sierra College in Rocklin.
Dogwoods are usually hardy and trouble-free in reasonably well-drained soils, though they can be affected by the fungal disease anthracnose.
Those who suppose flowering dogwoods are just pretty additions to the landscape would be wrong.
PLANT OF THE WEEK - Cornus (Dogwood) SOME dogwoods like Cornus sanguinea 'Midwinter Fire' become attractive during the autumn, when their leaves turn a delicate yellow-orange before falling to reveal fantastic stem colours.
Catoctin historically had high numbers of eastern flowering dogwoods (Cornus florida) but suffered a substantial mortality rate once the disease invaded the park.
We present evidence that dead dogwoods tend to have larger neighboring conspecifics than do living dogwoods, that smaller trees have higher levels of foliar infection than larger trees and that in trees of reproductive size, higher levels of anthracnose infection are associated with lower fruit production.