Dolce Stil Nuovo

Dolce Stil Nuovo

 

(sweet new style, in Italian), an Italian school of poetry of the late 13th century. Its head was the Bolognese poet G. Guinizelli; among his followers were the Florentine poets G. Cavalcanti, the young Dante, and D. Frescobaldi. Dolce stil nuovo poetry was characteristic of the Italian preRenaissance in central and northern Italy when self-knowledge and interest in the inner world of the individual were developing. Dolce stil nuovo poets sang an ennobling, exalted love of woman. However, in some poems (especially those by Cavalcanti) love was a cruel force, inspiring fear and confusion. The main poetic virtues of the school were the elegance and musicality of the verse form.

REFERENCES

Gaspari, A. Istoriia ital’ianskoi literatury, vol. 1. Translated by K. Bal’mont. Moscow, 1895.
Storia della letteratura italiana, vol. 1. Milan, 1965.
References in periodicals archive ?
PG: He is completely distinct from the troubadors and has nothing, or almost nothing, to do with the dolce stil nuovo.
Yet scarcely half a century later, Francesco Petrarca, who too followed the general spirit and philosophy of dolce stil nuovo envisaged by Dante, wrote in one of his sonnets:
Indeed, the new poetry aspiring to reach God by love transformed into philosophy and religion came to be called, in Dante's own words, dolce stil nuovo.
Scholars of the Middle Ages know him and will remember him with much appreciation for his studies on the dolce stil nuovo, Dante, and Boccaccio.
Habria que recordar la poesia de los trovadores provenzales y, un poco mas tarde, el Dolce Stil Nuovo de la Italia de Dante.
Italian jurist, poet, and prose writer whose poetry, written in the dolce stil nuovo ("sweet new style"), was admired by Dante and was a great influence on Petrarch.
One of the most prolific of the dolce stil nuovo poets, Cino is generally considered inferior to others of the school despite the fact that in De vulgari eloquentia ("Of Eloquence in the Vulgar Tongue") Dante calls him the best Italian love poet.
They introduced what Dante called a dolce stil nuovo ( " sweet new style " ) in lyrical poetry.
On the contrary, the poets of the dolce stil nuovo brought together the idea of the ennobling effects of love and the notion that nobility represents an inner virtue (Lansing 220).
Within this period we learn of Dante's use of the dolce stil nuovo (sweet new style) and how Dante credited a predecessor in its development.
Cavalcanti, the poet of the complexities of love, contributed some of the most stunning examples of the dolce stil nuovo, as for example the sonnet that begins "Who is she coming, whom all gaze upon.
The form later spread to Italy, where it became popular among the poets of the dolce stil nuovo, including Dante.