Domagk


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Domagk

Gerhard . 1895--1964, German biochemist: Nobel prize for medicine (1939) for isolating sulphanilamide for treating bacterial infections
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In 1935, Gerhard Domagk reported that 'Prontosil' was curative against [beta]-haemolytic streptococci in animals and, subsequently, humans.
A self-described science geek, Tom Hager was thumbing through a copy of "Asimov's Biographical Encyclopedia of Science and Technology" when he came across an entry for a German physician named Gerhard Domagk.
Research Domagk saw hundreds of his fellow German soldiers die of infected wounds during the first world war, and worked for a solution for years before achieving a breakthrough which would lead his government to punish him.
Gerhard Domagk, whose major blunder, if indeed he committed one, was discovering it the year Hitler took over his native Germany.
In 1935, the German chemist, Gerhard Domagk, discovered that an azo dye, Prontosil, cured streptococcal infections in mice.
In the 1930s, Gerhard Domagk and others discovered drugs like Prontosil and chemically synthesized molecules--called wonder drugs--which also destroy harmful bacteria.
Later, Gerhard Johannes Paul Domagk (1895-1964), a German anatomic pathologist and bacteriologist, discovered that a red dye called prontosil rubrum protected laboratory animals from lethal doses of staphylococci and hemolytic streptococci.
12] It is said that Domagk, who was to win the Nobel Prize for his discovery of the red dye's bacteriostatic attributes, tried it on his own daughter for a streptococcal infection.
In 1935 Domagk managed to break up the molecule of Prontosil into several fragments, one of which was sulfanilamide, a compound already well known to organic chemists.
Chapter 1 provides a historical perspective to drug discovery, looking briefly at the pioneering work of researchers such as Ehrlich, Domagk, Fleming, Ahlquist and others.
Atkinson, 2002; Domagk, 2010; Dunsworth & Atkinson, 2007; Johnson, Ozogul, Moreno, & Reisslein, 2013; Kizilkaya & Askar, 2008; Moreno, Mayer, Spires, & Lester, 2001; Ozogul, Johnson, Atkinson, & Reisslein, 2013).