dominant allele


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Related to dominant allele: Recessive allele

dominant allele

[′däm·ə·nənt ə′lēl]
(genetics)
The member of a pair of alleles which is phenotypically indistinguishable in both the homozygous and heterozygous condition.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, although the detection of a dominant allele may indicate a hidden carcinoma in some cases, the use of digital PCR does not overcome the limited analytical specificity of KRAS mutations for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer.
Only the homozygous recessive genotype, yy, will produce genotypes that do not include a dominant allele for yellow.
Though an animal may show the dominant allele of a gene, it is not possible to determine by looking at the animal whether the second allele is dominant or recessive.
Other alleles have a dominant effect, where a single copy of such an allele in the presence of a recessive allele is sufficient to create the same biological effects as two copies of the dominant allele.
These results suggest that the bluish and greenish shell color variant types are controlled by recessive allele (b) and dominant allele (G) at a single locus, and the genotype of parental individuals in the pair-cross A are estimated as G/b.
As an illustration, Figure 3 shows the stationary frequency distributions of the most recessive and most dominant allele classes in the SSIdomcod model with and without FS.
The statistical analysis of fatty liver weight with different genotype combination showed that B, D, and F were the dominant alleles, because the fatty liver weight of their heterozygous or homozygous genotypes were significantly or very significantly higher than those of other homozygous or heterozygous genotypes (p<0.
1 Given each parent's genetic makeup, assign an uppercase letter for a dominant allele (one that expresses a visible trait) and a lowercase letter for a recessive allele (one that is masked by a dominant trait).
Because of the linkage between the SSR and E loci position, we can infer with varying degrees of certainty the presence of the dominant allele in each public soybean cultivar.
A recessive allele for habitat preference thus increases in frequency much slower than an analogous dominant allele, especially when it is still rare.
At that locus the dominant allele C allows full expression of any of the genes for pattern, color or dilution which are present.
But we have shown that the rise of the dominant allele (per generation) was four times as fast as the rise of the recessive allele (18% vs.