Don Quixote


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Don Quixote

 

(also Don Quijote), the hero of M. Cervantes’ novel El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quixote de la Mancha (2 vols., 1605-15).

While wandering about the ruined and oppressed Spain of the late 16th century, Don Quixote is always prepared to undertake knightly deeds in the name of love for humanity, even though life roughly crushes his illusions. The incongruity of the latter with historical reality leads to innumerable ironical and grotesque situations. Don Quixote embodies the tragedy of a humanist who becomes convinced that the ideals of justice and harmony in human relations cannot be realized. His tragicomic and humanistic meaning has universal human significance. Don Quixote, the “knight of the doleful countenance,” has been variously interpreted in works of world literature and art, and his name has come to be used to designate a man who is noble, bold, and magnanimous but remote from reality. Don Quixote has often been mentioned in the critical and journalistic essays of many Russian writers, including V. G. Belinskii, N. A. Dobroliubov, D. I. Pisarev, I. S. Turgenev, M. E. Saltykov-Shchedrin, F. M. Dostoevsky, and A. V. Lunacharskii.

REFERENCES

Turgenev, I. S. “Gamlet i Don-Kikhot.” In Polnoe sobranie sochinenii i pisem v 28 tomakh. Soch., vol. 8. Moscow-Leningrad, 1964. Pages 169-92.
Derzhavin, K. N. Servantes: Zhizn’ i tvorchestvo. Moscow, 1958. Snetkova, N. Don Kikhot Servantesa. Moscow-Leningrad, 1965. Servantes i vsemirnaia literatura: Sb. statei. Moscow, 1969. Predmore, R. L. The World of Don Quixote. Cambridge (Mass.), 1967.

M. A. GOL’DMAN

Quixote, Don

knight-errant ready to rescue distressed damsels. [Span. Lit.: Don Quixote]

Quixote, Don

spends his life redressing the wrongs of the whole world. [Sp. Lit.: Cervantes Don Quixote]

Quixote, Don

falls into a trance and has visions of Montesinos and other heroes. [Sp. Lit.: Cervantes Don Quixote]

Quixote, Don

ascribes all his misfortunes to the machinations of enchanters. [Span. Lit.: Cervantes Don Quixote]

Quixote, Don

completely taken in by all the tales and plans of his squire and others who humor his delusions. [Span. Lit.: Cervantes Don Quixote]

Quixote, Don

attacks windmills thinking them giants. [Span. Lit.: Don Quixote]
References in periodicals archive ?
'The Man Who Killed Don Quixote' has moments of slackness and chaos (the book does, too), but for the most part it's a lively, charming excursion into a landscape claimed by Gilliam in the name of Miguel de Cervantes, the Spanish gentleman who gave Don Quixote life back in the early 1600s.
Inspired by heroic stories of brave knights, Don Quixote of La Mancha and his faithful servant Sancho Panza set out on an adventure to meet his ideal woman, Dulcinea.
The fame of Cervantes lies in the fact that his novel Don Quixote is considered as the first modern European novel and the greatest one of all times.
Moving away from Don Quixote, Jose Manuel Hidalgo's "El ethos elegiaco de Tomas Rodaja en la 'Novela del licenciado Vidriera" connects the character from Cervantes's novela ejemplar--through Rodajas aviary costume--to the Latin elegiac love poetry of Ovid.
"Leyli and Majnun", "Don Quixote" ballets will be staged on September 26.
Don Quixote as Children's Literature: A Tradition in English Words and Pictures
Summary: London [U.K.], May 09 (ANI) Veteran filmmaker Terry Gilliam suffered a minor stroke over the weekend, days before a final verdict on whether his film 'The Man Who Killed Don Quixote' will be screened as the closing film at the 71st Cannes Film Festival.
The Spanish novel he refers to here is Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes.
His first analysis is from Cervantes's Don Quixote, from which several central ideas emerge: (1) Don Quixote, as the first modern novel, already "contains the germ of all future possibilities of the genre"; (2) Don Quixote in itself is a novel of the blind spot; (3) The blind-spot novels are those that collect the legacy of Cervantes and that express an ironic vision of the world; and (4) "the ideal instrument to place the irony in the very center of the novel" is, for Cercas, "the blind spot." Thus, the argument can be summarized in this way: the great modern novel is the heir of and debtor to Don Quixote to the extent that, already in the seventeenth century, Don Quixote contains all the modern elements which the novel will only fully develop from the nineteenth century on.
If you think that imagination can't take you anywhere in life, then you haven't heard of Don Quixote. In real life, he's just an ordinary man named Alonso Quejano from La Manchawho loves reading books about knights and chivalry.
Indianapolis, IN, February 07, 2018 --(PR.com)-- Fat Turtle Theatre Company Presents the Indiana Premiere of The Quest for Don Quixote by Mark Brown
''Don Quixote' is very special to Ballet Philippines , starting with the first grand pas de deux in 1973 by Nonoy Froilan And Muneca Aponte,' Floirendo said.