Barthelme, Donald

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Barthelme, Donald

(bärt`əlmē), 1931–89, American writer, b. Philadelphia. The son of an architect, he grew up in Texas, moved (1962) to New York City, worked as a curator and an editor, and taught creative writing at several universities. In his short stories and novels, Barthelme describes a world so unreal that traditional modes of fiction can no longer encompass it. His stories are frequently literary collages, employing advertising jargon, bits of text from other writers' works, counterfeit footnotes, recondite allusions, and various typographical and narrative extravagances to fit his own private and ironic vision of an absurd reality. Barthelme's works include the novels Snow White (1967) and The Dead Father (1975); the short-story collections Unspeakable Practices, Unnatural Acts (1968), City Life (1970), Sadness (1972), Great Days (1979), and Sixty Stories (1981); a collection of nonfiction pieces, Guilty Pleasures (1974); and a children's book (1971).

Bibliography

See biography by T. Daugherty (2009); memoirs by his brothers F. and S. Barthelme (1999) and his ex-wife H. M. Barthelme (2001); studies by L. Gordon (1981), W. B. Stengel (1985), S. Trachtenberg (1990), R. F. Patteson, ed. (1992), B. L. Roe (1992), and M. T. Hudgens (2001).

Barthelme, Donald

(1931–89) writer; born in Philadelphia. He left Houston, Texas, journalism in the early 1960s to live in New York City as a professional fiction writer. A regular New Yorker contributor, he was an influential postmodernist whose deadpan tone, fragmented narrative structure, and linguistic playfulness were widely imitated. His eight volumes of collected stories and four novels include Come Back, Dr. Caligari (1964), Snow White (1967), The Dead Father (1975), and Paradise (1986).
References in periodicals archive ?
The Metafictional Muse: The Works of Robert Coover, Donald Barthelme, and William Gass.
During the late 1970s, Fran Lebowitz, in a satirical piece imagining a writers' strike, thought that any group holding back copies of the magazine would immediately find itself "fire-bombed by a radical organization that believes that Donald Barthelme belongs to the people.
To cite Donald Barthelme again: Collage is the art of the twentieth century.
Patteson, "Introduction," in Critical Essays on Donald Barthelme, ed.
If his poetry defied many of the traditional conventions, it was in his fiction that he achieved his most startling achievements in stretching the limits of the American novel with fresh ideas about narration, structure, story, pacing and description, lie was in a league with other rogue novelists such as Roland Barth, Thomas Pynchon, Donald Barthelme and Reed.
Based on a short story of the same name by American author Donald Barthelme and adapted by Hayes, The School is the story of a teacher who is diligently trying to teach his students how to be responsible when taking care of living things in the classroom; with sad yet intensely funny results.
Seuss, Donald Barthelme, Don DeLillo, Chis Van Allsburg, Laurie Anderson, and Leonard Cohen--offer a revised sense of postmodern possibility, one which not only contests the presumption of an absolute break with modernism, but also accommodates itself to a society that so quickly and so willingly absorbs and employs the very confrontations and incongruities historically associated with the avant-garde.
Harper's discussion moves from the Hollywood novels of Nathanael West to Alan Parker's film The Commitments, with individual chapters for Gwendolyn Brooks and Ralph Ellison, and linked discussions of Anais Nin, Djuna Barnes, Donald Barthelme, Robert Coover, Thomas Pynchon, and Maxine Hong Kingston.
Donald Barthelme uses a range of techniques, we are told, to expose the 'fraudulent signs' of his culture.
Brother of writer Donald Barthelme, Frederick attended Tulane University, the University of Houston, and Johns Hopkins University.
Like that of her friend Donald Barthelme, Grace Paley's voice has become an influential sound in contemporary American literature because it reminds us that although the story can no longer be told as it once was, it still needs to go on being told.
After an opening chapter which takes on the 1940s in something of a rush, the book gets into full stride with chapters on the following topics: African American Fiction; Southern Fiction; Jewish American Fiction; Black Humor; Metafiction; Realism; Fiction by Women; and, finally, the author's tips for the top: Donald Barthelme (I'm not quite convinced) and Toni Morrison (Beloved does persuade me).