Donegild

Donegild

killed by Alla for abandoning his wife and son at sea. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales, “Man of Law’s Tale”]
See: Murder
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97) of English common law; yet in Chaucer's day lawyers were struggling 'to extricate themselves from what had become a suffocating ecclesia mater not unlike the notoriously "suffocating mothers" represented by the Man of Law via the Sultaness and Donegild', two 'infamous mothers' who 'endeavor to stifle their respective sons' efforts to move beyond their immediate family (p.
Constaunce as a reading and letter-writing woman in Trevet, however, has a counterpart in Chaucer's second wicked mother-in-law, Donegild, also in Trevet, who assaults and usurps male hegemony in her jealous political and religious (and suggestively incestuous) desire for power in her kingdom.
Here is the description of Chaucer's Donegild (mother of Alla, the second husband) who, again, is horrified that a Christian woman should bewitch her son into giving up his creed: