Donetskii

Donetskii

 

an urban-type settlement in Voroshilovgrad Oblast, Ukrainian SSR, near the Vodoprovod railroad station. Population, 12,000 (1970). There is coal mining in the vicinity of Donetskii.

References in periodicals archive ?
These companies include American, European and Russian manufacturers such as: Altec, Amkodor, Astec, BAV, Becema, Caterpillar, Chetra, Donetskii Excavator, DSTS, FKR Machinery, GAZ Group, JCB, JLG, Komatsu, Kominvest AKMT, Kvintmadi, Link-Belt Cranes, Manitou BF, Manitowoc, New Holland Kobelco, Pogruzchik, Terex, Trimble, Uraltrak, Uralvagonzavod, Vermeer and Volvo.
ISBN 966-7907-16-3, Donetskii Natsionalnyi Tekhnicheskii Universitet, Ukraine, 28, 265-270
Whereas blast furnaces have been fired at Donetskii for over 120 years, West Siberian was constructed in the 1960s and 1970s.
Although neither West Siberian nor Donetskii (nor nay other major industrial plant, for that matter) struck along with the miners in July 1989, these plants were hardly without conflict.
Moreover, with its thirty-two thousand employees, the plant was twice the size of Donetskii, and its newness and relative profitability left greater resources at its disposal.
By far the shop in the worst position at Donetskii was the open-hearth shop, which was over a hundred years old.
At Donetskii, the conflict remained one over which categories of workers should be admitted to the privileged housing line.
Donetskii increasingly used barter deals to provide consumer goods to employees who could not afford the sprialing prices on the market, while West Siberian built a savings bank, a shoe factory, and a brewery at the plant, and also assured its employees that no one would be left without a job.
Though party activists continued to participate in plant meetings, the party committee itself began to withdraw quietly into the background at Donetskii, while at West Siberian it found itself increasingly on the defensive, as the Kuzbass miners began calling for removal of the Communist Party from all enterprises.
For instance, at Donetskii, less than three weeks after the region's coal miners had first filled city squares and seized control of mines, the trade union committee met to discuss fulfilling the plan.
For example, two months after the miners first struck, at a plantwide conference at Donetskii to elect a new trade union chair (the old one was reelected), a delegate from the casting shop raised some serious issues: due to the lack of steel, his shop had not fulfilled the plan for the second month, thereby cutting workers' wages drastically.
As noted above, the director of the Donetskii steel plant was elected to the Ukrainian Supreme Soviet, joining many other industrialists who have formed powerful blocs in the Ukrainian and Russian parliaments.