Donor atom

Donor atom

An impurity atom in a semiconductor which can contribute or donate one or more conduction electrons to the crystal by becoming ionized and positively charged. For example, an atom of column 5 of the periodic table substituting for a regular atom of a germanium or silicon crystal is a donor because it has one or more valence electrons which can be detached and added to the conduction band of the crystal. Donor atoms thus tend to increase the number of conduction electrons in the semiconductor. The ionization energy of a donor atom is the energy required to dissociate the electron from the atom and put it in the conduction band of the crystal. See Acceptor atom, Semiconductor

References in periodicals archive ?
Sousa, Electrochemical synthesis of metallic complexes of bidentate thiolates containing nitrogen as an additional donor atom, Coord.
5] fragments react quickly with any available donor atom to yield a M[(CO).
When atoms of these two kinds interact, a re-arrangement of the electron distribution occurs; an electron from the donor atom migrates to the acceptor atom thereby making the acceptor atom negatively charged and the donor atom positively charged.
There is mounting evidence that the molecules that are best at this contain soft donor atoms to the metals.
Highly unusual di- and tri-metallic Ln-SMMs are proposed in which the metals are bridged by radicals with heavy Group 15 donor atoms (i.
For example kryptofix 222 having nitrogen and oxygen donor atoms has drawn interest due to % its ability to selectively bind ions especially alkali and alkaline earth metal cations [8-10].
The presence of both hard nitrogen and soft sulphur donor atoms permits coordination with a wide range of transition and non-transition metal ions yielding stable and extremely coloured metal complexes, some of which have exhibited interesting physico-chemical [2-4] and potentially beneficial chemotherapeutic properties [5-8].
The thermodynamic characteristics of doubly charged ions of 3d metals with ligands containing oxygen, nitrogen, and fluorine donor atoms are analyzed.
Forty sections treat ligand whose donor atoms come from a single group in the priodic table, ligands with mixed donors, and multidentate macrocyclic ligands.
Due to the fascinating structure with multiple N and O donor atoms, it may be potential applications in organic light emitting diodes (OLED).