Dostoevsky


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Dostoevsky

, Dostoyevsky, Dostoevski, Dostoyevski
Fyodor Mikhailovich . 1821--81, Russian novelist, the psychological perception of whose works has greatly influenced the subsequent development of the novel. His best-known works are Crime and Punishment (1866), The Idiot (1868), The Possessed (1871), and The Brothers Karamazov (1879--80)
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Dostoevsky's lifelong writerly interest in the Parable marks one of the most important and extensive returns to Christ's story in the history of the novel, but it is of course only part of a greater novelistic engagement with parabolic narrative in the modern period.
In this Article, I explore this fixation with childhood suffering and suggest that Dostoevsky implicitly predicted the core tenets of a relatively new legal movement, called "therapeutic jurisprudence" ("TJ"), (3) and I broach the question of why this matters.
Critical interest in the link between Dickens and Dostoevsky has deep roots, dating back to the nineteenth-century critic George Gissing, who noted, "Not seldom in reading Dostoevsky one is reminded of Dickens, even of Dickens's peculiarities of humour" (qtd.
These thinkers, in particular, are Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881) and Max Scheler (1874-1928).
DIRECTOR Richard Ayoade (Submarine) puts his own spin Dostoevsky's novella, updating the action from 19th century Russia to surrealist modern-day America in The Double (Channel 4, tonight, 12.15am).
DIRECTOR Richard Ayoade (Submarine) puts his own spin on Dostoevsky's novella, updating the action from 19th century Russia to surrealist modern-day America in The Double (Channel 4, tonight, 12.15am).
Throughout his research, the Russian philosopher Bakhtin looked to the aesthetic phenomenon present in the works of Rabelais, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Pushkin and other writers.
Surprisingly, while virtually no one doubts Fyodor Dostoevsky's profound and direct indebtedness to Miguel de Cervantes in The Idiot, manifested in the obvious connection between Don Quixote and Prince Myshkin, no one yet has fully analyzed both how and why Myshkin-a character more dialogically elaborate and versatile than Don Quixote-turned out to be more limited in literary expressivity than his more "monological" counterpart.
Most poignant to the Russian reader will be to see translations of Woolf's essays on Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, Aksakov, and other, less known, Russian authors.
Those who are uncertain about God and his attributes may ask: "If God is great and God is good, then why does He allow evil to exist?" The accusations of Ivan Karamazov, to his brother Aloysha, in Fyodor Dostoevsky's novel are common.
In this sense, Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-81) was such an ethical writer and Mikhail Bakhtin who discovered it was an ethical critic.
In his 1963 monograph Problems of Dostoevsky's Poetics, (1) Mikhail Bakhtin famously categorizes Lev Tolstoy as a "monologic" author.