Dostoevsky

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Related to Dostoyevsky: Anton Chekhov, Leo Tolstoy

Dostoevsky

, Dostoyevsky, Dostoevski, Dostoyevski
Fyodor Mikhailovich . 1821--81, Russian novelist, the psychological perception of whose works has greatly influenced the subsequent development of the novel. His best-known works are Crime and Punishment (1866), The Idiot (1868), The Possessed (1871), and The Brothers Karamazov (1879--80)
References in periodicals archive ?
The explanation for the absence of this elementary question is, of course, the literary genius of Dostoyevsky. He made the transitions from the possible to the impossible narrations so smooth, so imperceptible, that they remain invisible to all but the most attentive reader.
'Man only likes to count his troubles; he doesn't calculate his happiness', I tell him, quoting possibly the only Dostoyevsky quote I can remember.
(36) Dostoyevsky's response, with all the succeeding ideas of Russians as God-bearing people destined to save the world from Western ungodliness, prophetically set an example of a conservative rebellion of the sacred mind, which, instead of being "determined on laying claim to a human situation in which all the answers are human, in other words formulated in reasonable terms," (37) revolts against the very prospect of such a choice.
In the study at hand, I explore how the source of joy is demonstrated as being one of knowledge rather than one of circumstance in Dostoyevsky and Bernanos.
Plays or prose by four writers, William Shakespeare, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Hermann Hesse, and C.S.
SAINT PETERSBURG: Inside an old Saint Petersburg flat that was once home to Fyodor Dostoyevsky, a new exhibition plunges visitors into the dark and complex world of "Crime and Punishment," shedding new light on one of Russia's greatest literary works 150 years after its publication.
A while ago I reread Fyodor Dostoyevsky's classic novel "Crime and Punishment" as it reminds me about human nature.
Earlier works sourced text from Rostand's Cyrano de Bergerac (Absolute Event, 2013) and Sartre's No Exit (In Camera, 2012); here, Dostoyevsky's protoexistentialist novella Notes from the Underground provided content to rub against the grain of the formulaic lecture style symptomatic of our neoliberal moment--the TED talk, in which innovations in technology, entertainment, and design are narrated as stories of personal transformation delivered in lean, highly seductive narrative arcs.
You must read all the Dostoyevsky in the library, and forget it.
Mark Wahlberg, best remembered for being best mates with a stuffed toy in Ted, stars in a peculiar and haphazard psychodrama based on Fyodor Dostoyevsky's minor 19th century novella.
"In Talking Band's performance lab, we were reading new translations of Dostoyevsky," Zimet reports, "alongside critical commentary by Mikhail Bakhtin.
Returning to Stead's important point, why shouldn't contemporary readers read the actual great novelists of the 19th century--Balzac, Dickens, Melville, Eliot, James, Wharton, Twain, Stendhal--not to mention Tolstoy and greatest of all Dostoyevsky, instead of Catton's ersatz and inferior version?