dot-com bubble

(redirected from Dot com bust)

dot-com bubble

The late 1990s during which countless Internet companies were riding an enormous wave of enthusiasm that pushed their stock valuations into the stratosphere even though they never made a penny. Billions in venture capital were given to entrepreneurs with little or no experience to fund ideas that were ludicrous. It was a crazy time, and people were very excited. With all of the nonsense, many dot-coms did survive, and countless concepts and techniques were developed that continue today. Compared to other industries, one must keep in mind that the Internet is still in its infancy! See dot-com and New Economy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Structural bear markets are caused by financial bubbles, most recently the dot com bust of 2000 and the real estate bubble of 200.
The world economy has seen an unusual number of challenges over the past two decades, including the Dot Com Bust, the Sub-Prime Crisis and the Great Recession.
The dot com bust was not that long ago for most of us.
Our first fund was completed at the height of the dot com bust and we went on to invest in some of the strongest companies in our portfolio today.
A recent report by the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) forecasts that sales of semiconductor technology are set to slump next year for the first time since the dot com bust of 2001.
The climate for internet business in the UK is improving for those who have weathered the storm in the aftermath of the dot com bust of 2000.
While the most popular search terms are keyed in many thousands of times more than the least popular, they make up only a small proportion of the total number of searches, says Joe Kraus, a founder of Excite.com, a portal that fell victim to the dot com bust in 2001.
Brigitte PREISSL, Harry BOUWMAN & Charles STEINFIELD (eds) E-Life after the Dot Com Bust Physica-Verlag, Heidelberg, 2004, 287 p,
So Gates went stumping at universities, telling students disillusioned by the dot com bust that they can still make a good living, even as the computer industry sends some jobs, like software programming, abroad.
The dot com bust left the once red hot San Francisco market in tatters.
The dot com bust did not mark the end of the internet and e-business.