dot-com bubble

(redirected from Dot com crash)

dot-com bubble

The late 1990s during which countless Internet companies were riding an enormous wave of enthusiasm that pushed their stock valuations into the stratosphere even though they never made a penny. Billions in venture capital were given to entrepreneurs with little or no experience to fund ideas that were ludicrous. It was a crazy time, and people were very excited. With all of the nonsense, many dot-coms did survive, and countless concepts and techniques were developed that continue today. Compared to other industries, one must keep in mind that the Internet is still in its infancy! See dot-com and New Economy.
References in periodicals archive ?
It also went down a lot in the wake of the dot com crash, and indeed, after 9/11, and that didn't presage recession.
Kevin Dorren, who built Orbital Software into a business valued at PS70m, but dramatically lost value in the dot com crash was also at the event.
The video charts the entire chronicle of online milestones - from the birth of the founder of online shopping, Michael Aldrich, 70 years ago, to the dot com crash in 2001 to the rise of internet behemoths YouTube and Google - and of course not forgetting viral singing sensation Susan Boyle," added Simpson.
He said: "Technology companies in the region learned lessons from the dot com crash in the early 2000s and having survived the last recession, they are now ready to focus back on growth and they realise they have a lot to offer.
A few months later the dot com crash turned into a visionary in an instant.
Part 2 questions the role played by e-commerce business models in the dot com crash.
Jane Caldwell's 'The Business of New Media' looks at the mediascape in the wake of the dot com crash and argues that while the buzz word of 'interactivity' might not point to anything new for media producers, the real challenge in the twenty-first century is flexibility and cross-media responsiveness.
The dot com crash appeared to have lowered retailers' expectations of internet take-up by consumers, with only 10pc of retailers expecting internet shopping to have a marked impact on Christmas sales compared with 28pc last year.
The results during the volatile summer months were similar to what we saw during the turbulent years after the dot com crash.
After the dot com crash in 2000 the Footsie has never been able to scale the heights it reached in 1999.
This is compared with 2002 - shortly after the fall-out from the dot com crash - when the PEPI was at a six-year low of 8.
Despite the downward trend in the industry following the dot com crash, the ICT industry continues to show enormous potential.