dot gain


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dot gain

An increase in size of each dot of ink when printed due to temperature, ink and paper type. A press operator tries to minimize dot gain, which can muddy the printed image.
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As a result, a dot gain of 20 to 30 percent (dependent on your particular press) should be allowed for in the production of digital artwork.
This technology has also significantly reduced the issue of dot gain by rubberizing the free-running impression roller.
Vignettes actually print 100% to 0%, and there is incredible detail in the images with no dot gain.
Earthinks has been developed with a low viscosity and low foaming levels to deliver sharp images with lower dot gain than standard inks.
It is very difficult to classify all the parameters that can and do affect on print quality, but it is certain that the dot gain is surely one of the most important parameters that define the quality of printing product.
Some print scanning has been done with 900 dpi to study the dot gain in the environment of individual screen element (Fig.
Whether you are facing the arcane art of offset printing for the first time, a layout person trying to optimize the page without offending or a technology-driven person anxious to know absolutely everything about dot grain, there is no doubt Breede covers it, along with paper issues (including basis weight, M weight, ream weight, equivalent weights of paper, bulk determination, cubic area of skids or rolls), print calculations (such as total dot gain, density, opacity, printing cylinder calculations, color spaces and color calculations), prepress (including file size, scanning resolutions, unsharp masking and gray levels) and common conversions, including nonmetrics to metrics.
It's important to use products designed with optimized coatings that result in good dot gain and excellent color output.
Dot gain is the apparent increase in the size of the printed dot area from one medium to another.
It provides a primer on color printing processes, including the importance of such issues as dot gain and ink density.
The advent of digital production requires graphic designers to be much more involved with the physical processes of the digital pre-press, including image calibration, dot gain, use of color key, screen clash, and trapping, in order to minimize errors in the final print.
The Effects of Some Engraving and Film Substrate Parameters on the Solid Density and the Dot Gain in Gravure Printing -- E.