dot-com company

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dot-com company

An organization that offers its services exclusively on the Internet, either via the user's Web browser or a client program that must be installed in the user's computer. Amazon.com, Yahoo!, Google and eBay are examples of dot-com companies. Telecom companies that offer voice or video services over the Internet also fit into the dot-com company umbrella.

But, Doesn't All Software Access the Internet?
Today, almost all software accesses the Internet for some purpose, if only to look for updates that can be downloaded. However, that does not necessarily make the company a dot-com company. The software or service must be hosted on the company's computers and accessed by users over the Internet. See dot-com.
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Online before dodging the dot-bomb by connecting with DailyCandy in 2000.
Others words include Twittersphere, Tweetup, Hacktivist, Clickjacking, Twitpic, Scareware and Dot-bomb.
When the dot-corn boom became the dot-bomb bust, times became challenging for a multitude of industries.
Between the Dot-Bomb, the Telecom collapse, the Internet, the housing bubble, the bank crisis, and disruptive technologies, we've been beaten about like a Pinata on Cinco de Mayo.
As many companies learned the hard way in the dot-bomb era, the best content management systems on the planet cannot create valuable content--that's always done by smart people.
Sascha Lewis and Mark Mangan founded Flavorpill.com in late 2000 (fresh out of a dot-bomb retail site) with a handful of contributors and a few hundred New York City subscribers.
She considers terms relevant to fashion (bandeau, camkini), sports (BASE jumping, zorbing), business (dot-bomb, undertime), and more.
The result is now known as the dot-bomb phenomenon.
Y2K caused most enterprises to upgrade their LANs; the dot-bomb flooded the market with additional used and unsold product.
Early issues of the Standard emitted a pleasing new-car odor), then by writing a negative article about Standard columnist Michael Wolff author of the early (1998) dot-bomb diary Burn Rate.