dot-com bubble

(redirected from Dot-com boom)

dot-com bubble

The late 1990s during which countless Internet companies were riding an enormous wave of enthusiasm that pushed their stock valuations into the stratosphere even though they never made a penny. Billions in venture capital were given to entrepreneurs with little or no experience to fund ideas that were ludicrous. It was a crazy time, and people were very excited. With all of the nonsense, many dot-coms did survive, and countless concepts and techniques were developed that continue today. Compared to other industries, one must keep in mind that the Internet is still in its infancy! See dot-com and New Economy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike the great recession of the early 2000s or dot-com boom back in the 1960s, climate change can lead to irreversible damages, ones that can and will be felt by all other generations moving forward.
He never foresaw the post-tech wreck, the dot-com boom, nor did he forecast the Great Recession of 2008-09.
Research from Chicago-based industrial real estate firm JLL shows a clear connection between increases in clear heights--the amount of feet measured from the floor to the bottom of a lowest hanging ceiling object--and e-commerce activity going back to the dot-com boom. Since the boom, JLL noted that while the annual growth of the e-commerce portion of total retail sales has risen 15.6%, the average clear height of buildings delivered in 2018, at 33.6 feet, has gone up 18.1%.
During the days of the dot-com boom, tech IPOs had the reputation of being an easy win for investors, with big first-day gains virtually guaranteed.
CeBIT was once considered the best barometer of technological trends, and during the dot-com boom in the late 90s and early 2000s, it boasted some 850,000 visitors a year.
The results of these two items are summarized in Gallups Economic Confidence Index, which, at +31, is essentially unchanged from last month (+33) and continues to rank among the best measured since the dot-com boom in the late 1990s and early 2000s.
The index was last at that level in January 2004, and has not been higher since November 2000 (+39), at the tail end of the dot-com boom.
This accounts for bigger and faster growth than the dot-com boom of the 90s.
In the late 1980s it was stocks in Japan, and in the late 1990s it was the dot-com boom.
ICOs have been lucrative for investors but there is also increasing concern that their disproportionate growth could end in similar tears to the dot-com boom.
Situated before the Great Recession, characters both lambaste and revere the dot-com boom and other technological advances.
Ravicher, an attorney who has represented startups since the dot-com boom in the late 1990s, will supervise the students.