dot-com bubble

(redirected from Dot-com craze)

dot-com bubble

Throughout the late 1990s, countless Internet companies were riding an enormous wave of enthusiasm that pushed their stock valuations into the stratosphere even though they never earned a penny. In the dot-com bubble, billions of dollars in venture capital were given to entrepreneurs with little or no experience to fund ideas that were ludicrous. It was an emotional time, and people were very excited. In spite of the nonsense, many dot-coms did survive, and concepts and techniques were developed that continue today in other companies and other forms. See dot-com company, dot-com bust and New Economy.
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References in periodicals archive ?
What are you smoking?," which argues that "The rapid rise of marijuana legalization has created what some people call a bubble for marijuana stocks [...] reminiscent of the dot-com craze in 1999."
In addition, the current bull market has a lot more breadth than bull markets before the dot-com craze and financial crisis.
This is a lesson the world learnt the hard way with Dutch tulips in Rembrandt's Amsterdam, Louisiana swampland in Louis XV's Paris, Kuwait's Souk Al Manakh, the 1980s Tokyo property bubble, the 1990s Silicon Valley dot-com craze, Wall Street US subprime mortgage and toxic credit derivatives and Australian iron ore crash.
But venture capitalists like Sandy Miller, an executive at Silicon Valley firm Institutional Ventures, argue that, unlike during the dot-com craze that peaked in 2000-01, the current crop of Internet companies are actually showing profits.
Jeff Mose: It happened to us after the dot-com craze. We had a broker and we'd invested a lot of money, and suddenly it was gone--and she was gone, too.
"When everything was red-hot, everybody and their brother wanted to go into the business," she said, likening the exuberance to the dot-com craze of the late 1990s, when many underqualified young people tried their hand, unsuccessfully, at day-trading.
Nor is it clear how we all knew that LTCM's failure or the post-September 11 malaise posed grave risks to the system, but could seriously doubt that the dot-com craze was a bubble.
Many of the players in the first dot-com craze of 1998-2001 have returned for a second go-around, seeing the Web as a viable platform to launch businesses.
Instead of creating a corporate marketplace, an idea whose heyday peaked with the dot-com craze, the digital world will start to more closely resemble the real world, Johnson suggests.
"During the dot-com craze, things got a little wild (for investing) but we didn't do that," Walls said.
We reported the launch in an April 2000 NewsBreak (http://www.infotoday.com/newsbreaks/nb000410-1.htm) and noted the impending closure last month (http://www.infotoday.com/newsbreaks/nb030113-2.htm), According to The Wall Street Journal, "The closure marks yet another failure of efforts by colleges and universities to cash in on the once-sizzling dot-com craze by offering courses and other learning opportunities over the Internet." It may take a significant upturn in the economy as well as a new public attitude toward the value of quality educational content to enable the success of a for-profit online venture.
During the late 1990s, at the height of the dot-com craze, Tesco's "low-tech" approach relying on store-based fulfillment was questioned by analysts dazzled by such operators as Webvan Inc., which rapidly spent $1.2 billion to build expensive, highly automated distribution centers to serve customers who never materialized.