dot-com bubble

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dot-com bubble

The late 1990s during which countless Internet companies were riding an enormous wave of enthusiasm that pushed their stock valuations into the stratosphere even though they never made a penny. Billions in venture capital were given to entrepreneurs with little or no experience to fund ideas that were ludicrous. It was a crazy time, and people were very excited. With all of the nonsense, many dot-coms did survive, and countless concepts and techniques were developed that continue today. Compared to other industries, one must keep in mind that the Internet is still in its infancy! See dot-com and New Economy.
References in periodicals archive ?
was an early adopter of digital banking, dating back to the dot-com era of the late 1990s and early 2000s.
As opposed to the dot-com era, the current surge in investment volume is mainly driven by large deals involving later-stage companies with proven track records. 
He describes the Mosaic web browser and Netscape; Microsoft and Internet Explorer; AOL and early online services; Pathfinder, HotWired, and the introduction of advertising; early search engines and Yahoo; Amazon and the birth of e-commerce; eBay, community sites, and portals; the dot-com era and bubble; Netscape vs.
One of the poster boys of the dot-com era, Stephan rode the wild high of seeing his digital dreams come true, only to confront the sometimes-ugly reality of being the youngest-ever CEO of a public company.
However, as the dot-com era underscores, the bursting of an investment bubble may signal both a crash and the dawn of a new era.
Similar to medtech's dot-com era, when many companies' valuations prematurely skyrocketed due to the dot-com "aura," many startups today are experiencing similar valuation build-up simply by being associated with digital health.
In 2018, it's led an epic bust that rivals the dot-com era stock market collapse.
He said: "We're a very different company, because at the very beginning of the dot-com era, we were focused on simple products like flights business.
That total represents the highest amount since the dot-com era and more than twice the amount invested in the years following the market crash of 2008-2009, according to PitchBook, a financial data and software company.Last year was a good time to launch a startup, as more than $84 billion in venture capital was raised in the U.S.
While stocks have shot up, growth has been slow in this recovery and pay gains have been meager, a stark difference from the dot-com era. The 1990s saw computers enter the workforce, helping fuel high levels of worker productivity, wage increases and growth.
Stephen Peepels, a capital markets lawyer at Hogan Lovells in Hong Kong, said, 'During the dot-com era, everybody wanted to go into one of the internet start-up companies because it was the new thing, it was exciting, with the possibility to make a lot of money if the company made it to an IPO.
This "sky is the limit" psychology has been present in other assets the last two decades, including the dot-com era of 1998 and 1999, crude oil in 2008, and gold in 2011.