multiple cropping

(redirected from Double-cropping)

multiple cropping

[′məl·tə·pəl ′kräp·iŋ]
(agriculture)
A system of growing several food crops on the same field in one year.
References in periodicals archive ?
To achieve both crop productivity and yield sustainability in double-cropping systems, high-rate fertilisation is required (Singh et al.
The amount of the double-cropping rice is equal to that produced over three seasons in the past, marking a big breakthrough, he said.
Rather than applying with mineral fertilizer alone, the fertilizer regime of application mineral fertilizer with manure or rice straw is benefit for maintain both soil quality and high grain yields in double-cropping production systems.
Under natural rainfall conditions, relay cropping (in which the soybean crop is seeded between rows of growing camelina plants) used less water than double-cropping (whereby soybean seed is sown right after a camelina harvest, around mid to late June).
An important innovation is taking place in the cerrado region: a double-cropping system called safrinha.
This research project aims to study the tolerance of winter crops for the dry summer cultivation and saline water irrigation and to select crops for double-cropping scheme and a variety of crop rotation.
In double-cropping systems the fertilizer is calculated for the system and half of nitrogen may be applied in the organic form according to the requirement of the first crop.
This can be achieved through double-cropping, where a second crop is grown in the same production area as the first crop (Duval 2005; Santos et al.
The project is expected to enable double-cropping (two harvests per year) of rice and horticultural crops, as well as to improve the productivity of rice and other crops by expanding the total cultivated area from 7,860 ha to 16,920 ha in the project area.
2000, 2003) in the annual double-cropping (winter wheat and summer maize) regions of northern China since 1997.
Over-cultivation of [genetically modified] soy and double-cropping has led to serious soil erosion in Argentina in the past," says Miguel Rivas, a third-generation Argentine corn farmer.