Dougong

Dougong

Chinese term for a cluster of brackets cantilevered out from the top of a column to carry the rafters and overhanging eaves of a roof.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Philippine colonial houses, to remain standing, employ a Chinese building technique, known as dougong. There are some cool online videos of scale models of dougong buildings being shaken in simulated earthquakes, and the engineering is impressive, indeed.
Examples of dougong houses can be found in Binondo, Vigan, Malolos, and elsewhere.
The architecture of the cafe also reportedly utilized the mechanics of the bucket arch (Dougong in Chinese) structure, a system of brackets unique to traditional Chinese architecture, to provide sturdiness for the building.
Zhang, "Experimental study on stiffness of Dougong in Chinese ancient buildings," Advanced Materials Research, vol.
Its name comes from 'dougong' -- an ancient Chinese structural element of interlocking wooden brackets, used to support historical Chinese temples and palaces, and shows strongly through the bar's interiors.
Wining and dining venues will include GONG, London's highest bar on level 52, which takes its name from 'dougong', an ancient Chinese structural element of interlocking wooden brackets that will be a component of the interior.
G?NG, London's highest bar on level 52, takes its name from 'dougong' - an ancient Chinese structural element of interlocking wooden brackets that will be a component of the bar's interior.
Traditionally, China has had a rich architectural heritage within which even the most elementary architectural eye could identify common architectural motifs: Dougong brackets that articulate the junction between column and beam; sweeping concave roofs that create distinctive silhouettes in both urban and wild rural contexts; brightly painted timber; and perhaps most fundamentally, the systematic grouping of buildings around courtyards, where the now overused Western architectural cliche of making inside/outside space had merit, authenticity and appropriateness.