Dovrefjell


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Dovrefjell

(dô`vrəfyĕl), mountainous region of S Norway, c.100 mi (160 km) long and 40 mi (60 km) wide, culminating in Snøhetta (7,500 ft/2,286 m high). It is crossed by the Dovre railway and highway and is the source of several important rivers. It is a symbol of steadfastness and independence in Norwegian folklore and literature.

Dovrefjell

 

a plateau in western Norway. It rises to an altitude of 2,286 m (Mt. Snöhetta). The bare, rocky surface of Dovrefjell is dissected by deep river valleys. In low areas are many lakes and marshes. The summits are granite, with cirques and other alpine forms of relief; there are névés. The vegetation is mainly mountain tundra with lichens and mosses and, in places, dwarfed forms of willow, birch, and juniper.

References in periodicals archive ?
I recently had a meeting on the matter with the mayors of Lesja and Dovre, and with the head of the Dovrefjell National Park Board.
In The Gradual Disappearance of Jane Ashland, Nicolai Houm turns the trope of a writer in search of a subject on its head by showing Jane's tragedies in flashback, elaborating eloquently on her grieving process as she ill-fatedly stumbles through the Dovrefjell mountain range attempting to rediscover inspiration and closure.
(2016) summarized the pathological findings from mortality events occurring in the introduced muskox population in Dovrefjell, Norway.
ABOVE: a musk oxen shakes snow from its coat, Dovrefjell National Park, Norway, by Roy Mangersnes, Norway These animals lived with the woolly mammoth in these mountains 40,000 years ago; BELOW: This photo was captured from the expedition vessel M/S Stockholm.
03 CONTEMPORARY FOLLIES (The Monacelli Press) honors 51 modern-day structures that are harmonious with their natural surroundings, such as Snohetta's recently completed Norwegian Wild Reindeer Pavilion in Dovrefjell National Park (near right).
Thus, very sparse and scanty food in Svalbard resulted in small groups ([bar]x = 3.8, range = 2-11 animals), but in the Dovrefjell and Forelhogna mountains in Norway (where food resources were plentiful) reindeer aggregated into large groups ([bar]x = 290, range = 55-1,300 animals).
The Dovrefjell population in Norway is considered to be the last mountain reindeer herd in Europe (Skogland 1989a).
The Forelhogna herd in Norway east of Dovrefjell consisted of about 1,700 individuals.
This procedure excluded large groups of domestic reindeer and 1 observation in the Dovrefjell population.
Disturbance experiments were repeated (on different days) in the Dovrefjell, Wrangell, and Forelhogna groups.
Feral reindeer on Wrangell Island demonstrated a longer flight distance than all other populations except the Dovrefjell population (Table 2), and differed significantly from domestic populations (Table 3).
A correlation analysis revealed that this occurred for flight distance in Chukotka (Spearman r = -0.589, P < 0.001), Forelhogna (Spearman r= -0.602, P = 0.038), and there were indications of a similar pattern in most other populations (e.g., Bol'shezemel'skaya, Spearman r = -0.242, P= 0.058, and Dovrefjell, r=-0.301, P = 0.153).