Drake equation


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Drake equation

[′drāk i‚kwā·zhən]
(astronomy)
An equation which gives the number of advanced technological civilizations curently active in the Galaxy as the product of the rate at which new stars are born in the Galaxy, the probability (actually a product of probabilities) that any one of these stars will possess the necessary conditions for life to originate and to slowly evolve to a technological civilization, and the average longevity of such civilizations.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A mathematically stronger version of the Drake Equation called the Statistical Drake Equation was used to figure out how many advanced alien species can exist.
With the number of habitable planets in our galaxy and the estimation of the existence of advanced alien life using the Drake Equation, Abramowicz said that that there is a chance of finding one if we know where to look. 
Frank Drake, then at Cornell University and creator of the Drake equation, wrote the message with help from Carl Sagan, among others.
The Drake Equation is gradually filling out, and it's looking good for the existence of life, the rise of intelligence, and the likely number of civilisations elsewhere in the universe.
The question of whether or not aliens are out there forms the basis of the Fermi paradox, which itself contains mathematical models like the Drake equation.
While working at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, West Virginia, in 1961, Drake first presented what has come to be known as the "Drake Equation," which has been used ever since to estimate the likely number of advanced civilizations in the galaxy.
16), isn't it time to update the Drake Equation? Frank Drake's famous 1961 formulation refers to "habitable planets," and at the time Saturn and its moons were consid ered to be far outside the "Goldilocks zone." Yet, with the discovery that even remote Enceladus might be life-friendly, surely "moons of planets" should also be factored into the equation.
The second half presents the scientific perspective, beginning with how what we know about chemistry and biology on Earth constrains what aliens could possibly be like, and continuing on to the famous Drake equation and current possibilities for detecting extraterrestrial life.
There's an equation called the Drake Equation which estimates the probability of finding a planet capable of supporting intelligent life.
Using the Drake equation, first theorized in 1961, such planets were intuited and later proven to actually exist.
He also tests the validity of the Drake Equation, which states all the ingredients you need to make an intelligent civilization.
The Drake Equation works out the science of Star Wars: Apparently it estimates the number of active communicative extra terrestrial civilisations in the Milky War galaxy.