draughtsman

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Related to Draughtsmanship: draftsmanship, Draftsmen

draughtsman

(US), draftsman
1. a person skilled in drawing
2. Brit any of the 12 flat thick discs used by each player in the game of draughts
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
At 16, she attended Chelsea School of Art, where her draughtsmanship was recognised with a scholarship.
"The draughtsmanship is excellent and the different types of marks he uses gives the effect of wool.
"McCheyne gives us cool modern expressionism that fits into that aesthetic, including some really great sculptures, plus lots of cool linear drawings that show his draughtsmanship."
Adopting the stable draughtsmanship of 50s cartoons, it puts the iron boot into coercive militarism.
10ROSEMARY Evans, 21, the only female student out of 33 on a building practice course at Central Liverpool College, was recognised for her brilliant draughtsmanship skills.
I became interested in the possibilities of watercolour, mainly because of the endless tonal variations possible, and it suited my draughtsmanship abilities very well.
Gallery owner Natalie Harrison said: "The original watercolours are full of high-quality draughtsmanship, wit and energy.
The authors also affirm that the sketches reflect a maturity of draughtsmanship that is better attributed to the more accomplished Jyotirindranath.
His many log books testify to his splendid draughtsmanship, work which is to be added to the BAA archive.
In an oversize format (10x11.5") allowing generous display of the images, this presentation contains highlights from the collection along with scholarly analysis of individual works and an informative essay on the history, theory, and practice of Spanish draughtsmanship and the various regional schools.
When it comes to patterns, Wilhelm sees a return to old-style draughtsmanship with intricate floral motifs, alongside a design trend she dubs "supranatural", a kind of high-tech take on the living world, whether insects or leaf shapes.