dreadnought

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dreadnought

, dreadnaught
1. A battleship armed with heavy guns of uniform calibre
2. Slang a heavyweight boxer
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Dreadnought

 

a British battleship that inaugurated this class of warships.

The design of the Dreadnought reflected the experiences of the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-05, in which the inadequacies of the armorclads were revealed. Built in Portsmouth in 1905-06, the Dreadnought had a displacement of 17,900 tons and a speed of 21 knots (39 km/hr). Its armament consisted of ten 305-mm guns mounted on five two-gun towers; 24 76-mm guns mounted on the sides (on large-diameter towers) and on the bow and the stern; and five underwater torpedo tubes, four in the sides and one in the stern. Its armor was 280 mm thick at the center, 203 mm at the bow and the stern, 44-70 mm on the deck, and 280 mm around the towers and the deck cabins. The main difference between the Dreadnought and its predecessors, the armorclads, were the unified calibers of all the main and antimine artillery, greater speed, and antimine defense; a rhombic arrangement of the artillery towers made it possible to fire from the sides and stern from eight and from the bow from six guns of the main caliber. The Russian equivalent of the Dreadnought was the improved battleships of the Sevastopol’ type.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
A big dreadnought or jumbo will generally sound better with medium-gauge strings that take fuller advantage of their relatively larger sound chambers.
Pro-Bolshevik rhetoric emerged coevally in the Dreadnoughts original cartoons.
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Like dreadnoughts, these pioneering subs required a new sort of sailor.
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Leaving the green and going down out through the gatehouse, you turn back and look at the grey zinc roofs of what at first evokes a strange notion of the Grand Fleet with two squadrons of Dreadnoughts sailing in line astern to make a pincer movement on the Kriegsmarine.
To have the man holding the purse strings in our midst impressed us all--although I thought I had perhaps heard the joke about the dreadnought warships before (the last time the Treasury indulged in consultation it ended up with fewer dreadnoughts apparently).
Nobody wants the school board meeting story to proceed: School superintendent Joan Dean's back was as tense as a tiger's when angry parents, chins jutting out like dreadnoughts bearing down on a U-boat, confronted her on the district's new dress code.
The first and last great confrontation of dreadnoughts, Jutland brought home the fact that technology had accelerated, that navies were vulnerable to defeat "in an afternoon" it found deficient in armor, gunnery, or flash protection.