Dred Scott


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Related to Dred Scott: John Brown, Dred Scott v. Sandford
Dred Scott
Sam Scott
BirthplaceSouthampton County, Virginia, U.S.
Died
NationalityAmerican

Dred Scott

decision majority ruling by Supreme Court that a slave is property and not a U.S. citizen (1857). [Am. Hist.: Payton, 203]
References in periodicals archive ?
They suggest--rather counterintuitively, given Justice Taney's statement in Dred Scott (9)--that African Americans did have some rights that white men (and courts) were obligated to respect.
Dred Scott had a powerful legal argument on his side: When a master takes a slave to live on free soil, the master has emancipated that slave.
Epps points out the incongruity that passionate antislavery thinkers who devised the Citizenship Clause as a means of overruling Dred Scott would have any intention to create a new class of noncitizens lacking all rights.
Of course, Taney had explained why he believed that African-Americans needed no protection of habeas corpus or trial by jury three years earlier in the Dred Scott decision.
This essay shows how politics and law affect the everyday lives of African American communities by analyzing the contrapuntal conversation between Sherley Anne Williams's 1986 novel Dessa Rose, and the legal narrative Dred Scott v.
Puleo's comprehensive chronicle outlines the "domino effect" of the period's other portentous events -- the Compromise of 1850; the Fugitive Slave Law; John Brown's raid at Harpers Ferry; the Dred Scott Supreme Court case; the rise of the antislavery Republican Party; the election of Abraham Lincoln to the presidency in 1860 -- and shows with mastery how these measures conspired to dissolve the Union.
Narrator Judge Rick Defuria began with the 1857 case Dred Scott v.
Focusing on historic cases such as Dred Scott and much more, "57 Years" is a vital addition to any American history collection focusing on the prelude to the Civil War.
Wong connects Keckley to Dred Scott and his wife Harriet Robinson Scott and places them among a number of those who secured legal freedom through manumission and obtained licenses to live as free blacks in Missouri.