Dreissenidae


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Dreissenidae

 

a family of bivalve mollusks. The adult forms attach themselves to underwater objects and the bottoms of ships with the aid of the byssus that they secrete. Their development includes a free-swimming larval stage. The mollusks live mainly in fresh water, but also in the Caspian and Aral seas, the Sea of Azov, and in the freshened sections of the Black Sea. The species D. polymorpha is the one most widely found in fresh water; it readily spreads to river systems and quickly settles in new bodies of water (reservoirs). It can settle in large masses in hydraulic structures and interfere with their normal functioning. The mollusks are controlled by chlorinating the water and painting the hydraulic structures with paints toxic to the larvae; cathode protection of hydraulic structures is now a tactic, and methods are being devised for fighting the larvae with ultrasound.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The aim of our study was to analyze the early, trochophore, and veliger larval development of the nervous system of the biofouling bivalve Dreissena polymorph[R] (Dreissenidae, Bivalvia, Mollusca).
2006), and the zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas, 1771) (Veneroida: Dreissenidae), both of which invaded the Great Lakes and became important in the diet of turtles (Bulte & Bloudin-Demers 2008) and other predators such as birds (Petrie & Knapton 1999) in this region.
At the top of the Middle Cuyahoga River below Lake Rockwell, Dreissenidae, zebra (Dreissena polymorpha) and/or quagga (D.
Effects of hydrology on unionids (Unionidae) and zebra mussels (Dreissenidae) in a Lake Erie coastal wetland.
Comparative study on the accumulation of heavy metals by bivalves from the families Unionidae and Dreissenidae // Proceedings of the Orenburg State University, 6: 348-350.
Planktivory by alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and ranbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) on microcrustacan zooplankton and dreissenid (Bivalvia: Dreissenidae) veligers in southern Lake Ontario.
Most of the marine species in this new freshwater mass became extinct, but some adapted to life in the lower salinity, among them mollusks like the zebra mussels (family Dreissenidae) and the cockles, or heart clams (family Cardiidae).
Zebra mussels (Dreissenidae) were identified at FWS2.
Colonization, ecology, and population structure of the "quagga" mussel (Bivalvia: Dreissenidae) in the lower Great Lakes.
The dark false mussel (Mytilopsis leucophaeata) is also in the family Dreissenidae and also had blue patches extending the length of the anterior and posterior edges, with more distinct yellow on the anterior edge (Fig.