Driftless Area


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Driftless Area,

c.13,000 sq mi (33,670 sq km), largely in SW Wis. but extending into SE Minn., NE Iowa, and NW Ill. The continental glacier which covered most surrounding regions did not touch this area, which abounds in caves and sinkholes and has residual, well-drained soil. Because it was an important lead-mining region, the federal government prohibited farming in the Driftless Area until the 1840s. It was then settled by European immigrants.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the glacial outwash drainage system in the driftless area cut deeply into the Ordovician and Cambrian beds of western Wisconsin and extreme eastern Minnesota, removing major thicknesses of overburden from most of the frac sand mining area, relict glacial outwash deposits obscure portions of the river valleys (Runkel and Steenberg, 2012).
Thursday: Trout Unlimited meeting: The Driftless Area with Larry Bush, 6 p.m.
Schultz</b> lives in the Driftless area of Wisconsin.
Wildlife in the Driftless Area is subject to habitat damage from soil erosion, sedimentation, filling of sinkholes, and degradation of water quality.
The study area (Figure 1) is located in the Western Corn Belt Plains and Driftless Area ecoregions (Omernik and Gallant, 1988) in southeast Minnesota and contains 8,339 mapped sinkholes (Gao et al., 2002).
Instead, the fearless animals holed up in southwestern Wisconsin's Driftless Area, a region nearly surrounded by ice.
Late Pleistocene (Woodfordian) vertebrates from the Driftless area of Southwestern Wisconsin, the Moscow Fissure local fauna.
In Wisconsin, positive high-density sites were found in the southwestern driftless area and in the central sandy uplands, as well as in the well-recognized northwest part of the state (and across the state line into Minnesota).
Final report (contract number 30181-1259) northern Driftless Area survey.
Crop rotations and nitrogen: crop sequence comparisons on soil of the driftless area of southwestern Wisconsin, 1967-1974.
The paleoecology of Iowa, southern Wisconsin, and Illinois is important in understanding paleoenvironments of the Midwest because (1) many taxa that were forced south during glaciation moved through these regions to their present position following deglaciation; (2) the paleoecology of the Driftless Area south into much of Illinois and eastern Iowa is poorly known; and (3) the axis of the "Prairie Peninsula" (Transeau 1935) runs through this region.
Because Jo Daviess County lies within the Driftless Area of the upper Midwest, it was spared the last advance of Ice Age glaciers that flattened the surrounding land.